In the Temple of the Lord

temple-of-the-lord

A powerful word from God delivered by Jeremiah at the temple gate in Jerusalem. Powerful enough, in fact, that this is what Jesus was reenacting at the “cleansing of the temple”, which was not so much an emotional cleansing as a pre-meditated protest of the temple by Jesus.
If we read this with an open mind, and understand what Jesus was doing with his reenactment four days before the crucifixion, then it is plain that this prophetic criticism of the worshippers in Jerusalem still has a message for us today.
The word that came to Jeremiah from the Lord: “Stand in the gate of the Lord ‘s house, and proclaim there this word, and say, Hear the word of the Lord, all you men of Judah who enter these gates to worship the Lord. Jeremiah would have been standing at the front of the temple gates; all who were coming to the temple, or just wanted to be near what was happening at the temple, would have been able to hear him.

repentcross
Thus says the Lord of hosts, the God of Israel: Amend your ways and your deeds, and I will let you dwell in this place. Do not trust in these deceptive words: ‘This is the temple of the Lord, the temple of the Lord, the temple of the Lord.’ The covenant between Yahweh and Israel was conditional. They would posses the land God had given them only as long as they kept the covenant law. Obviously, they were not keeping the law, but gives them plenty of chances to repent of their sins and return to the Lord. Do not trust in these deceptive words: ‘This is the temple of the Lord, the temple of the Lord, the temple of the Lord.‘ The people told themselves “we are good. We got this!! Yeah, we might do a little idol worship. We might not love God with all our heart, soul, mind and strength, but we have the temple. We are here every Sabbath day. We offer up our sacrifices like good Jews, Yahweh will forgive us.” But Jeremiah tells them those words are deceptive.

bull-sacrifice
“For if you truly amend your ways and your deeds, if you truly execute justice one with another, if you do not oppress the sojourner, the fatherless, or the widow, or shed innocent blood in this place, and if you do not go after other gods to your own harm, then I will let you dwell in this place, in the land that I gave of old to your fathers forever. I am reminded of another prophet Jesus borrowed from here – “For I desire steadfast love and not sacrifice, the knowledge of God rather than burnt offerings.” Hosea‬ ‭6:6‬ ‭ESV‬‬. Our God is a God of justice, a God who cares about the most vulnerable. The people at the temple thought that as long as they came and made their sacrifices, then all was good for them. They could burn incense to other Gods, walk past and do nothing to help the sojourner (immigrant), the orphan, the widow. They could live by the scapegoating spirit of Satan, always blaming, shaming and accusing others, just as long as they had their temple and made their sacrifices.

ten-commandments
“Behold, you trust in deceptive words to no avail. Will you steal, murder, commit adultery, swear falsely, make offerings to Baal, and go after other gods that you have not known, and then come and stand before me in this house, which is called by my name, and say, ‘We are delivered!’—only to go on doing all these abominations? Steal, commit adultery, commit murder, swear falsely, make offering to other gods – all things specifically prohibited in the Ten Commandments. To think we can live our lives any way we want to, treating people any way we want, then show up to confession on Saturday (if you are Catholic) and church on Sunday and all is well with us, is to believe a lie. To live as Gods people is not about temple sacrifice. It’s not about going in to service and singing the songs or going through the sacraments. We do those things, yes, and they are good. But that’s not what being the people of God is all about. Living as the people of God is about being the light in the darkness, being the leaven in the yeast, the salt for seasoning. We make it all about Sunday, but really it’s much more about Monday through Saturday. How are we living between church services? How do you live Monday through Saturday? Do you gossip? Make promises you don’t keep? Do you walk briskly by every homeless person, avoiding eye contact and hoping they don’t speak to you (like I usually do). Are you looking at every member of the opposite sex that walks by and thinking about what you would like to do with that?  Are we quick to forgive, or do we hold grudges?   Do we pray for our enemies?  Or do we pray something happens to our enemies?   Do we live like atheists Monday through Saturday, then think our temple offerings and sacrifices make us right with God?
Has this house, which is called by my name, become a den of robbers in your eyes? I’ve heard that before, haven’t I?

den-of-robbers
Behold, I myself have seen it, declares the Lord. Go now to my place that was in Shiloh, where I made my name dwell at first, and see what I did to it because of the evil of my people Israel. And now, because you have done all these things, declares the Lord, and when I spoke to you persistently you did not listen, and when I called you, you did not answer, therefore I will do to the house that is called by my name, and in which you trust, and to the place that I gave to you and to your fathers, as I did to Shiloh. And I will cast you out of my sight, as I cast out all your kinsmen, all the offspring of Ephraim.” Yup…it’s a den of robbers alright. God saw it with his own two eyes. The Jews in Jerusalem at the beginning of the reign of Jehoiakim thought that as long as they made their sacrifices at the temple, that made everything else they did ok. But just as with Shiloh, which had the tabernacle and the ark of the covenant, this temple would eventually be destroyed. Truth be told, God never asked for a temple to be built, He actually told David He did not want a temple. Just because we are in the house of the Lord does not mean we get immunity in the rest of our lives. If we do not live as the people of God, if we are not representing His live to the world through our Monday through Saturday lives, then we are outside of His will regardless of how sincere we think our Sunday worship is.

sunday-worship

“The word that came to Jeremiah from the Lord: “Stand in the gate of the Lord ‘s house, and proclaim there this word, and say, Hear the word of the Lord, all you men of Judah who enter these gates to worship the Lord. Thus says the Lord of hosts, the God of Israel: Amend your ways and your deeds, and I will let you dwell in this place. Do not trust in these deceptive words: ‘This is the temple of the Lord, the temple of the Lord, the temple of the Lord.’ “For if you truly amend your ways and your deeds, if you truly execute justice one with another, if you do not oppress the sojourner, the fatherless, or the widow, or shed innocent blood in this place, and if you do not go after other gods to your own harm, then I will let you dwell in this place, in the land that I gave of old to your fathers forever. “Behold, you trust in deceptive words to no avail. Will you steal, murder, commit adultery, swear falsely, make offerings to Baal, and go after other gods that you have not known, and then come and stand before me in this house, which is called by my name, and say, ‘We are delivered!’—only to go on doing all these abominations? Has this house, which is called by my name, become a den of robbers in your eyes? Behold, I myself have seen it, declares the Lord. Go now to my place that was in Shiloh, where I made my name dwell at first, and see what I did to it because of the evil of my people Israel. And now, because you have done all these things, declares the Lord, and when I spoke to you persistently you did not listen, and when I called you, you did not answer, therefore I will do to the house that is called by my name, and in which you trust, and to the place that I gave to you and to your fathers, as I did to Shiloh. And I will cast you out of my sight, as I cast out all your kinsmen, all the offspring of Ephraim.”

‭‭Jeremiah‬ ‭7:1-15‬ ‭ESV‬‬

http://bible.com/59/jer.7.1-15.esv

John Lewis

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18 thoughts on “In the Temple of the Lord

  1. Okay,

    I am gonna try to take some time to react to this one. A very good post. Very insightful. Biblical all through. I love it, every bit of it, for just these reasons.

    I really love that you see Jesus in the Jeremiah lens. I think that is soooooo important to do. It shows a depth of Bible study to go there with it. You could just say a lot of wise sounding stuff and pepper it with Jesus’s name and so forth and pass it off as Bible study. You could go prooftexting through the Bible. You could read the Bible with a wooden literalism. Any and all of these pass for Bible study these days, but you went for depth. You bounce sparks off Jesus and Jeremiah and make application for all of us. And that is huge!

    Thank you for doing that.

    Now… I want to challenge some of your offerings. I choose the word challenge because I want to enhance the thoughts alright, but that does not mean I am in disagreement (necessarily). In some respects I want to take the very good stuff you offered to a next step or level or whatever. Or I want to demonstrate other ways of looking at the material. Sometimes I engage other ways of looking at things, not because I am in agreement with it, but because it then opens doors for other thoughts (for instance, Feminist scholar ship has looked at Hosea’s term for entice, and noted that in the Hebrew it CAN mean rape. IF we took that meaning of the word, then Hosea is telling us that God took Israel into the desert and raped her there. I of course take exception to that meaning, but it still begs the question why Hosea would choose a word that even allowed such ambivalence. And based on the fact that God does vacillate between unparalleled grace and unparalleled judgment and likens it to a jilted lover in that book, Even if we don’t think God raped Israel, perhaps Israel should wonder if he might not. And that is worth consideration – consideration that surely Hebrew speaking people would have readily noted.) Finally, my challenge hopefully has the capacity to open up other avenues of exploration which may or may not be worthy of your time, but how can you know that if you haven’t been challenged at least?

    I do a lot of thinking about the Temple in Jerusalem. No, I am not an expert on it at all. I stand to learn far more than I already know even now. But I have gone back to the gospels and found that the temple looms large in the backdrop in verse after verse, pericope after pericope, scene after scene. AND I think St Mark wrote first AND was prompted to write what he wrote because either the temple had just fallen or was under severe threat and about to fall! So… you have my interest to say the least.

    My first thought when reading your post began reflecting on how St Paul would tell us in Ephesians that Jesus is building a new temple of which we are the stonework! Whatever resonance you find between Jesus and Jeremiah very likely resonates with us (church) in just those ways today AND perhaps even adds to the findings!

    My second thought, one I did not catch in your offerings if it was there, is that in Jeremiah’s day, the people and the king were living apostate, we might say, in myriad ways – but profoundly as a matter of politics. Israel was a small nation pushed around between empires long before one of them took it into captivity. They were vassal to this king and that and playing one off against the other like a child of divorce with treachery and deceit. And part of how that played out was by worshiping the gods of whichever empire they tried to curry favor with as they resisted the others. They spit on their finger and lifted it into the spiritual atmosphere to decide which way to go all the time, and those winds shifted frequently. So, they played Hosea’s whore to all comers party as a means of national security and manipulations.

    In such circumstances, lots of Jews knew full well they were defiled, but hoped against hope that by virtue of having possession of the temple, God sorta owed it to them to stand with them despite their hearts being far from him and not trusting him in the face of great fear. They treated the temple like a talisman… a lucky rabbits foot… and felt sure God would honor that. Thus warning in Jeremiah not to trust in deceptive words.

    There is a LOT of application in this for the church today. But I will leave that for another time.

    Thirdly, I would point out that when Jesus cleanses the temple, he is tapping into a Jewish tradition which it was considered legitimated kings of the Jews. Solomon was king and he built the place. Josiah and Hezekiah were kings who cleansed it. And more recently in Jesus’s day, the Maccabees also restored the holy place, AND that was good enough for the Jews to let them be royalty even though they were not of the Davidic line! This explains Herod as well. Herod is building the temple far grander than Solomon ever dreamed, but he is not of the royal bloodline and EVERYONE knows it! They hate it too, but he has the stamp of approval from Rome, and they cant stop him. BUT, he thinks, if he rebuilds the temple and builds it FAR bigger and slathers it in gold from top to bottom, then he can win the hearts and minds of his subjects along the same line as the Maccabees had done.

    Anyway, building, cleansing, rebuilding etc… are KINGLY legitimations. When Jesus cleanses the temple he too very much has kingly aspirations! We should not miss this! It really is vital to understanding the gospels and why he gets killed and thus the divine irony that Pilate posts a sign that calls him KING after he is killed for this cleansing business!

    Finally, I would challenge you to consider the Greek word LASTAI (I think that’s how you spell it in English). It is the word that gets translated ROBBERS as in robbers den. That is a fair translation of the word alright, but a thorough word study reveals that it is idiomatic actually and refers to REBELS not common thieves. Jesus is saying, You have made My Father’s House of Prayer for all nations into a den of REBELS, which of course is exactly what Titus leveled to the ground in A.D. 70!

    This again has political connotation. yes there is irony in the fact that HERODs temple is characterized as a den of REBELS, but it is exactly that spirit that helps conservative Jews tolerate Herod as king in the hopes that despite him, God will come to live here and then help us throw off this Roman yoke in violence – a Jewish version of Jihad. And that of course is exactly what Jesus condemns in his statement when he cleanses the place!

    There… that is a lot, and I am pressed for time etc… but you always pack a lot of material into these posts of yours. To make a comprehensive response is usually impossible. However, you went into the temple on this one, and I have a lot to think about when I go there.

    Thanx for taking us there.

    X

    Liked by 2 people

    1. That is certainly a lot to think about! I always aim to just go beyond a simple surface reading. I really have only taken any of this seriously for a couple of years now, and in reading the bible it seems yo me like we live with merely a surface Christianity. Which I think likely is a consequence of simple, easy surface understanding of what is written in the bible.

      I really don’t know about huge Hosea possibly say God taped Israel, but I do know this – God is love. 100% love 100% of the time. Not half love half anger. So I would reject the notion of God raping Israel, whatever imagery Hosea may have been going for.

      There is much said about anger in the Old Testament, but I don’t go there without Jesus. If I can’t see Jesus in a text, I put it away and come back later. And sometimes when I grow, I can go back and see Jesus where I didn’t before.

      Jesus is the full revelation of God. He took all if our sins, all of our anger upon himself on the cross, took it down into hell, transformed it into love, and rose from the dead not seeking vengeance or revenge, but offering live and forgiveness, saying “peace be with you”

      He was the once and for all sacrifice for our sins. Think about this, since the temple was destroyed in ad 40, even the Jews no longer use animal sacrifice. Their sacraments are all scripture based from that time forward. So Abraham and Isaac ended human sacrifice, Jesus ended ALL live sacrifice for the forgiveness of sins.

      But consider this also – if his sacrifice was required by God, then why was he raised from the dead. Jesus’ resurrection was the REJECTION of OUR sacrifice by God the father. He was sacrificed to OUR systems and demands, not Yahwehs. Remember when Jesus reminded us of the word of the lord from Hosea? He desires mercy, NOT sacrifice.

      Yes, you are right, Israel was in much apostasy at thus time under Jehoiakim I believe. And I did consider referring to the church as the bride of Christ being broken and adulterous. But I actually deleted some of it, partly because I just don’t fully comprehend it all yet and need more seasoning myself before I try to write on that subject here.

      I have no knowledge whatsoever of the Maccabees…but I do know what we call the cleansing of the temple was actually a planned protest by Jesus. I’ve heard it said that he was angry when he walked in, and maybe he angry. But it wasn’t anger he reacted with. He took the time to braid his own rope, using it as a whip to get the ANIMALS out of there. He didn’t whip the people, he forced them out by overturning their table and chasing away the animals. It was a classic protest, done to stop business as usual in the temple.

      I do appreciate you taking the time. I will say very simply that you are much more knowledgable about much of this than am I am, and you have given me much to go back and study. Thank you!!

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      1. I have to say BOTH of you present a lot of great perspectives, connections, etc. Obviously, there’s seminary training here, right? I’m a layman. I read the Bible, but my understanding is not as broad or deep as yours; no Hebrew here! My way of saying “Thanks!” for the material, discussion, point and counterpoint. You both are giving me connections I’ve been unaware of, and opening my mind a bit more.

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        1. Thanx for that validation, Jeffrey!

          Let me come clean and be transparent here at all levels, I hope.

          John’s blog has my respect and admiration. I hear him say he is new to Bible study, and I believe him. Yes there are limitations that come with being new… but John really could give up that caveat. He is putting in the work, thought, and devotion at high octane levels. We must lean on scholarship, but we must not allow scholarship to close us out! John is getting it at serious levels, we might say. But just that very kind of talk runs the risk of puffing ourselves up. So, I appreciate his humility too.

          As I reflect on the exchange here I fear two things that I would like to head off before they need correction. First off, I am not a seminary GRADUATE. Yes, I have seminary training, but it is incomplete due to life circumstances that thwarted those goals for me. But yes, I have a lot of indepth training. However, I do not actually read HEBREW. I picked up a few bits here and there, but I do not READ it. As for Greek, I once was a reader – almost fluently – but my Greek is very rusty now. If you are old enough to remember typewriters, some people could “hunt-n-peck” but not type with fluidity. That is how my Greek is these days.

          So… a humility check of my own is in order here. Don’t go thinking I am a scholar. I am not. I read them avidly and learn SOOOOOOOO much from some of them, but I am no where in league with someone like N.T. Wright who is reputed as being able to quote the whole letter of Galatians IN GREEK among other extraordinary feats. I have dedication, but it cant match that!

          And as an addendum to this observation, I want to say again just because we are not scholars does not mean we cannot participate in exploring the depth of God’s word. It is entirely possible (if not likely) that we ourselves might add something to the conversation at those levels, though we are not likely to get scholarly credit for such insights since we have no credentials or access to such tables. But then neither did Jesus nor any of the apostles except St. Paul (Maybe). So, let us proceed with care and dig as deep as we can!!!

          Secondly, I fear that my observation about Rape in Hosea has become the tail wagging the dog here. That was meant to be a passing comment – an illustration of a dynamic – not the meat of my response. I chose it because I recognize it is a powerful illustration, not because it has relevance in and of itself to the post under discussion (which is the thing I am really jazzed about!). I am cool discussing the Hosea rape scene further, but I really do NOT have a clear conclusion on it at all on the one hand, nor is it the topic which drew me into this discussion and excited me at the start!

          I really want to talk about temple. And that is what John started with too. So, whatever else, I hope we can continue digging there especially.

          Again, Thanx for your response.

          X

          Liked by 2 people

          1. I am beginning to read NT Wright, but yes we all lean on those who came before us for understanding. As the Ethiopian Eunuch said to Phillip, how else can we understand what we are reading. But yes, we certainly can add our own thoughts to the conversation, and thank God for that! How else would we be having this discussion!!

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        2. Thanks Jeffrey!! I, too, am simply a layman. I have no seminary experience, or formal training at all in bible study. I do read quite a lot, spend much of my drive time listening to podcasts, and do simple bible studies on passages that interest me. I write whatever catches my fancy, it’s been said to me that this is like my personal spiritual journal which I share with whoever wants to read it. I don’t necessarily totally agree with that, but it’s also not too far off. I’m glad some of what I take the time to write gets some peoples curiosity up, that is really all I could hope for (that, and maybe winning hearts for Christ!). Thanks for sharing with us…

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  2. Yeah… I get the idea my offerings are not “winning” you over. And that’s fine. A little surprised, but its fine. Quite honestly, I hold a lot of stuff at arm’s length, like the rape observation. I certainly have conviction in my beliefs, and therefore I am not hooked on every new thing ever said by any stretch. But I am open minded and able to consider things. I cannot change the fact that the word has the possible meaning of RAPE. It is highly likely that definition is appropriate in other contexts and not in this one. But it is there as a possibility whether we like it or not – that part is not arguable. And it does beg the question why Hosea would choose a word that can go that way. Thus, I am open minded, but hold it at arms length.

    Let me offer this observation, which I hope you find valuable. If not, I will back waaay off making any more offerings. I don’t want to waste my breath or your time. But that does not mean I require agreement.

    I went to Bible school and studied under seminary professors who taught me to research for myself and we did this in an academic environment that promoted fresh thinking, challenges, and so forth, but did so in a staunchly conservative faith based atmosphere. A couple of things surface in that experience quickly. One is that research challenges a lot of old thinking al the time. In fact, I find it encouraging that you reject pie-in-the-sky Christianity. So do I. But I did not enter school with that paradigm. I had my old way of thinking AND that of my entire faith heritage, not least my parents and grandparents, totally challenged and then rejected as I embraced a Kingdom theology which is FOR THIS WORLD rather than against it. I find it highly unlikely that you came to this vantage ground without being challenged, and I certainly see that your offerings challenge those old traditional views in any who would read here. So, I know you are flexible enough to handle and open mind even if conservative enough to make changes cautiously.

    The other main thing that academic setting gave me was freedom to disagree and to change my mind again and again. My best friend in school was Russian/Jewish. A foreigner. That may have enhanced the fact that he could be soooooo disagreeable. Basically we ARGUED all the time! In fact he and I would openly debate during lectures over the things we researched and then would put the rest of the class on the spot and ask them to choose a side! It was in good fun, normally, and we maintained a DEEP friendship despite arguing constantly! But then sometimes my view would change, then change back again. OR it would change and then change to something else entirely.

    I am holding all this out to suggest levels of freedom in the discussion that I think are important. But I also suggest that the KIND of stuff I offer here is more in the realm of scholarly, meaning if you research what I say, you will find others thinking and talking about some of these things in similar ways. I am not just a kook blathering on about novelties here. Yes, they are open for debate. Some of what I think now, I will decide to reject later. We all do that – unless we are numb from the neck up. But there are greater minds at work on this stuff than you and me, and you have read some of them that I have not, and I have read some of them that you have not. These offerings merit consideration.

    Hear me carefully, I am not saying I think God raped Israel. But I wonder why such a word was chosen to describe what he did with them. There is space there for a lot of analysis that does not suggest God is a sadist. I want to know more, and that is just a handy example of intellectual inquiry in Bible matters.

    Btw, I highly suggest you read 1st Maccabees. Pick up a copy and just read 3 chapters in 20 minutes of your whole life, and then I double dog dare you to put it down. I bet you cant. It is fascinating stuff. And as you get a feel for the intertestamental period, I think you will find the Gospels bounding sparks off 1st Maccabees quite readily. I would also suggest a book by Russell called between the Testaments. It is a very dated scholarly offering, but for a new student, it is easy reading that will help you map out the state of the argument when you get to the heavy hitters. Check it out here –

    https://www.christianbook.com/between-the-testaments-d-s-russell/9780800618568/pd/18564?dv=c&en=bing-pla&event=SHOP&kw=academic-0-20%7C18564&p=1179517

    With that, I am really pressed for time. Neglecting babies here…. Gotta run. Look forward to your reply…

    X

    Liked by 1 person

    1. First…don’t think you are not “winning” me over. Understand that much what you are saying here is just very simply over my head at this point. You have a good amount of actual formal training in these things, and I do not. I’m not really even sure what verse in Hosea you are referring to where it may or may not say God raped Israel. I will go read it and find it, Hosea us not a long book.

      I will take you up on your challenge on the Maccabees. I’m assuming it’s history, because that what I’ve heard. And I think the history surrounding the gospels is good/important to know. And I have at least heard of that book you are referring to, have a list I’m going to give my wife to get me for Christmas, I’ll probably add that to the list.

      I don’t have a problem being challenged in my assumptions, it makes me think, and that’s only going to help me find my way even better.

      I certainly believe, as you do, that the phrase ‘Jesus is Lord” is not just about our afterlife affairs. It means he is in charge NOW. We may not see it, we really don’t even believe it. It’s really much easier to believe “Jesus saves” is just about jetting off to a faraway heaven. Makes it easier to pretend we don’t understand the ideas of Jesus. I would like to pretend I don’t understand. Because it means much more about my right here right now than I am comfortable with.

      So don’t feel like you’re wasting your breath. I am in the slow cooker tight now, just simmering and learning. I have years of research to catch up to you.

      Well…time for an hour and a half drive home, then thanksgiving meal with my CR brothers and sisters at church. As one of my church brothers likes to say – I love you, and there ain’t nothing you can do about it!!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. John, wow, what an interesting post and an interesting discussion.
    So, I feel free to add a my two cents about both.

    First your post. The thing I picked up of primary importance that I did not see at all in the ensuing discussion was about why Jesus was angry in the first place: “if you truly execute justice one with another, if you do not oppress the sojourner (immigrant), the fatherless (orphan), or the widow, or shed innocent blood in this place, and if you do not go after other gods to your own harm, then I will let you dwell in this place.” It wasn’t just about money exchange or animals in the temple; this quote from Jeremiah was the crux of the matter, and isn’t it interesting that we Christians are doing it again today and either unaware of it or unwilling to admit it.

    Second, the discussion points. I was raised Jewish and came to Jesus late in life. Both before and after I accepted the Lord, I studied and researched and read. I have attended two years of a certificated Bible interpretation program. Yet, what I know deeply is that what is important is my personal relationship with God and my understanding that the Bible is a living, breathing document. It is not written as a textbook to slice and parse or to divide us, but as a communication tool to enhance my relationship with Him.

    Agent X, it’s important to know that Jewish theology students as far back as Jesus’ time were taught to argue theological matters. It is what Jesus did in the temple when he was twelve years old. It is how they learned debate, apologetics and to think for themselves. Your Russian/Jewish friend was doing what he was taught to do from childhood.

    John, I also agree with you that Jesus is alive today and resides in us as the Holy Spirit. This is our Temple now. And in order to abide in Him, we must pay attention to those verses in Jeremiah.

    As for the Maccabees, I was raised on their story. In fact, their story is why Jewish people celebrate Hanukkah. Jesus, as a Jewish youngster, was likely made familiar with the story of the Maccabean Revolt, so you may also want to read about it. It’s a fascinating story of intrigue and miracles.

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