rebuke your disciples

I’m continuing what I started yesterday, looking at Jesus on the road to Jerusalem with the full knowledge of what the outcome would be.   Beginning today with his entry into Jerusalem, that triumphant entry where the whole multitude of his disciples began to rejoice and praise God with a loud voice for all the mighty works that they had seen, saying, “Blessed is the King who comes in the name of the Lord! Peace in heaven and glory in the highest!”   To which, of course, the Pharisees responded with this admonition  – And some of the Pharisees in the crowd said to him, “Teacher, rebuke your disciples.”   This was actually good advice from the Pharisees to Jesus, because his followers were declaring him King when Israel already had a king.  It was the kind of thing that might get one crucified for treason – which had happened plenty of times before.  Of course, Jesus knows what his purpose is, and the time to fulfill that purpose has come – He answered, “I tell you, if these were silent, the very stones would cry out.”   Jesus is the king, and the time for his coronation had come.

They could have been saved

And when he drew near and saw the city, he wept over it, saying, “Would that you, even you, had known on this day the things that make for peace! But now they are hidden from your eyes. For the days will come upon you, when your enemies will set up a barricade around you and surround you and hem you in on every side and tear you down to the ground, you and your children within you. And they will not leave one stone upon another in you, because you did not know the time of your visitation.”    The king has come with tears in his eyes.  He knows that in their hosannas there is a darkness still present, a kind of triumphalism which maybe we still share to this day.  Jesus followers were looking for a revolution, and they got one.  They were looking for a Messiah, and they got one.  But their revolution was not of violence, and their Messiah was not a conqueror.  He would not take up the sword and lead his army into a great battle, conquering his enemies by spilling their blood.  No, Jesus knows that despite their hosannas, the crowd cheering him would melt into the crowd jeering him.  They would choose a Messiah named Barrabas (which, by the way, means “Son of the father“) a violent revolutionary who saw the world as that crowd saw the world, as an us vs them proposition, we are right and they are wrong, we are good and they are evil.  They would choose the messiah who believed in violence as they believed in violence.  And some of those crying out Hosanna! on Palm Sunday would cry out “crucify him” as Pilate asked what to do with this King of the Jews.

king-jesus-2

But back to my original point here.  Jesus has come to Jerusalem, to the climax of his earthly ministry.  He has come to Jerusalem with tears in his eyes, weeping as he prophecies The End for Jerusalem and the temple.   Understand the real drama that is going on here, and high drama it is.  Because at the same time the temple establishment is seeking a way to bring and end to Jesus,  Jesus is predicting the end of the temple and the temple age.   His entire ministry, Jesus has preached almost nothing but the kingdom of God.   Kingdom of God, kingdom of God, kingdom of God, it’s all Jesus talked about.  Jesus believed the end of the temple was coming, and that the end of the temple would mark the coming of the kingdom of God.

Kingdom of God

The king had come to Jerusalem.  No longer was he telling his disciples to keep it under wraps that he was Messiah.  He comes to Jerusalem with tears in his eyes, because they simply do not know the things that make for peace!   Things did not have to go the way it did.   For the days will come upon you, when your enemies will set up a barricade around you and surround you and hem you in on every side and tear you down to the ground, you and your children within you. And they will not leave one stone upon another in you, because you did not know the time of your visitation.   Again, the whole story did not have to play out the way it did, and has.   Jerusalem could have been saved.  If they had recognized their true King when he visited them, they could have been saved.  But they don’t.  And 40 years later, in AD 70, what Jesus predicts would happen, happens.   40 years later, undoubtably with some of those who were in both crowds, before that generation had passed away, the crowd crying Hosanna and the crowd crying crucify him!, the Romans set up siege barricades around Jerusalem, hemmed them in on every side, and tore the city to the ground.  Men, women, and their children with them.  And no, not one stone was left upon another, because you did not know the time of your visitation.

crucify him

 

They could have been saved had they known the things that make for peace!   

peace

Lucky for us, we can…

FergusonTruth

“And as he rode along, they spread their cloaks on the road. As he was drawing near—already on the way down the Mount of Olives—the whole multitude of his disciples began to rejoice and praise God with a loud voice for all the mighty works that they had seen, saying, “Blessed is the King who comes in the name of the Lord! Peace in heaven and glory in the highest!” And some of the Pharisees in the crowd said to him, “Teacher, rebuke your disciples.” He answered, “I tell you, if these were silent, the very stones would cry out.” And when he drew near and saw the city, he wept over it, saying, “Would that you, even you, had known on this day the things that make for peace! But now they are hidden from your eyes. For the days will come upon you, when your enemies will set up a barricade around you and surround you and hem you in on every side and tear you down to the ground, you and your children within you. And they will not leave one stone upon another in you, because you did not know the time of your visitation.””

Luke 19:36-44 ESV

http://bible.com/59/luk.19.36-44.esv

John Lewis

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