good-samaritan

The parable of the Good Samaritan, a story so powerful the we still us the term “Good Samaritan” to describe someone who goes out of their way to help another, expecting nothing in return.   2000 years later, this story still inspires to us to become better people.

love-your-enemies

But, as with so many if Jesus teachings, there is another level, another dimension that is not apparent to us at first glance.  We read this and see it only as a challenge to us to do good to others, regardless of our opinions and thoughts about that person.  We are to do good for others even if we don’t like them.  Even if they are our “enemies”.   But this may be even more challenging than Jesus’ call to “love your enemies“?

Love-Your-Neighbor-As-Yourself-620x461

And behold, a lawyer stood up to put him to the test, saying, “Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?” He said to him, “What is written in the Law? How do you read it?” And he answered, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind, and your neighbor as yourself.” And he said to him, “You have answered correctly; do this, and you will live.” But he, desiring to justify himself, said to Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?”    Of course, it’s a lawyer trying trap Jesus and see how he can tear him down (I know, lawyers are my neighbors too).   But this lawyer defines pretty well for us our own conditions, even to this day.  We know we are supposed to love our neighbor.  But we are much more interested in defining who is our neighbor (or more to our point, who is not our neighbor).  We are far more interested in defining our neighbor than in loving our neighbor.

a-man-fell-among-thieves

Jesus replied, “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and he fell among robbers, who stripped him and beat him and departed, leaving him half dead.    So, to the point, the man going down from Jerusalem would have been a Jew.   Jesus is speaking to Jews here, the lawyer asking the question was a Jew, this man going down from the city of God was meant, clearly, to be a Jew.

good-samaritan-clipart-4

Now by chance a priest was going down that road, and when he saw him he passed by on the other side.    So we see a Jewish man left bloody, stripped, robbed and near death.  And we see the priest, from the Jewish temple, can’t stop and help the man.  Maybe he feared being made unclean and therefore unable to serve in the temple for a time.  Or maybe not, since he was leaving Jerusalem and the temple, not on the way up to Jerusalem. indicating his temple service may have already been finished.  Maybe he just figured no one was looking and he just didn’t feel like it.  After all, he had just served in the temple, he is good, right?  Either way, we have our command to love our neighbors, but we do also have our priorities…

cropped-bigcross

 So likewise a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side.   Another prescribed to the service of the Lord.  He loves God.  His neighbor, not so much.  So the two Jews in the story, both closely associated with the service of the Lord in the temple, can’t be bothered to help their fellow Jew, their brother, whom they see possibly dying in the street.  It’s no skin off their backs, is it?

good samaritan

But a Samaritan, as he journeyed, came to where he was, and when he saw him, he had compassion.   The Samaritan, the one who is formally excommunicated from the temple and all worship associated with it, the one hated by all 3 others in the story.  Hated by the priest.  Hated by the Levite.  Hated by the beaten man.  Hated by all Jews.  Remember what John told us about Jews and Samaritans –  “The Samaritan woman said to him, “How is it that you, a Jew, ask for a drink from me, a woman of Samaria?” (For Jews have no dealings with Samaritans.)” John 4:9 ESV.   Jews have no dealings with Samaritans.  But the priest, he would have no dealings with bloodied, beaten brother.  The Levite, he walked by as if his fellow Jew was just another dirty Samaritan.  But this Samaritan, the one hated by all Jews, he had compassion.  He didn’t walk by thinking “It’s not safe for me to stop.  I’ll be beaten too.”   He didn’t give himself the excuse “He’s already too far gone, I can’t do anything for him.”   He didn’t shake his fist and say to himself “He’s a Jew who would have no dealings with me!”   No, he had compassion on the man and wanted to help.

scene of samaritan

He went to him and bound up his wounds, pouring on oil and wine. Then he set him on his own animal and brought him to an inn and took care of him.    He doesn’t just stop to help, he takes personal responsibility for this man’s well being.   He became personally invested in the healing of this beaten, broken man.  You might even say he loved him.

jesus-compassion-4-638

And the next day he took out two denarii and gave them to the innkeeper, saying, ‘Take care of him, and whatever more you spend, I will repay you when I come back.’    Now he’s spending his own money on him!!  He’s promising to the innkeeper he’s willing to go beyond this if need be, just to see this Jew, who would have had no dealings with him, healthy again.   Do you see what Jesus is doing here?   He is speaking to a group of Jews, responding particularly to a “smart” lawyer (smart enough to figure out all kinds of way to get out of loving his neighbor).  His response is a story that does not just show us how we should love our neighbor.  He’s not just showing this man what it means to love his neighbor.  No, Jesus is cutting much deeper into the innermost being of this smart lawyer.  He could have crafted a story showing a good Jew stopping to love a hated Samaritan, but he didn’t.  He gave a story of the one the Jews hated most having compassion on a man most of them would have avoided contact with themselves.

cats and dogs together 3

So here’s how Jesus really turns their world upside down with this parable – What do you do when your enemy, the one you hate the most, loves you?   How will you react when the one you hate, someone you would under no circumstances have dealings with, is the one to step up unmistakably in love to help you or save you when everyone else, including all those you expected to be there for you, crosses the street to get away??   When those you thought were your friends leave you for dead, but that one is the one who has compassion?

mercy

Which of these three, do you think, proved to be a neighbor to the man who fell among the robbers?” He said, “The one who showed him mercy.” And Jesus said to him, “You go, and do likewise.

mercy not sacrifice

What will you do?   “And if you had known what this means, ‘I desire mercy, and not sacrifice,’ you would not have condemned the guiltless.” Matthew 12:7 ESV

guiltless

“And behold, a lawyer stood up to put him to the test, saying, “Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?” He said to him, “What is written in the Law? How do you read it?” And he answered, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind, and your neighbor as yourself.” And he said to him, “You have answered correctly; do this, and you will live.” But he, desiring to justify himself, said to Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?” Jesus replied, “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and he fell among robbers, who stripped him and beat him and departed, leaving him half dead. Now by chance a priest was going down that road, and when he saw him he passed by on the other side. So likewise a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. But a Samaritan, as he journeyed, came to where he was, and when he saw him, he had compassion. He went to him and bound up his wounds, pouring on oil and wine. Then he set him on his own animal and brought him to an inn and took care of him. And the next day he took out two denarii and gave them to the innkeeper, saying, ‘Take care of him, and whatever more you spend, I will repay you when I come back.’ Which of these three, do you think, proved to be a neighbor to the man who fell among the robbers?” He said, “The one who showed him mercy.” And Jesus said to him, “You go, and do likewise.””

Luke 10:25-37 ESV

http://bible.com/59/luk.10.25-37.esv

John Lewis

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