Getting Lucky

“…. Jesus went into Galilee, proclaiming the good news of God. “The time has come,” he said. “The kingdom of God has come near. Repent and believe the good news!”” Mark 1:14-15 NIV.

Rethink your life and believe something good is coming for you.  Believe that.   I know, some are more stubborn, some just have to know all the answers.   Some might be wondering, when I say something good is coming, well, why would something good be coming to me?    To which, I might just say “You’re just lucky I guess.”   Which is, in fact, a real theological response to the question.  If I tell you something good is coming, and you ask why and I say “because you’re lucky I guess,” that is a perfectly good theological response.

Eugene Peterson, the pastor, scholar, and theologian best known as the translator of the  Message bible, has said that he wanted to translate the beatitudes, “Blessed are the poor, blessed are the meek, blessed are are those who mourn,” instead of “blessed”, he had wanted to translate that word “lucky.”   He says that “lucky” captures what Jesus is saying in his beatitudes and completely fair to the word.  It captures, especially for the modern mind, exactly what Jesus is saying here.  “Hey, all you that are poor in being spiritual, WOO-HOO, lucky for you the kingdom of heaven is for people just like you!”   “Lucky are you who mourn, you’re going be comforted.”   “Lucky are you who are meek, you’re going to inherit the earth.”   This is how Eugene Peterson wanted to translate that Bible.  This is not my idea, but Eugene Peterson is the scholar and expert in biblical languages.

Let’s define lucky like this – “The mysterious experience of an unexplained grace.”   So when I say something good is is coming, and you say why?, and I say “you’re just lucky I guess”, I’m also saying “I don’t know!  It’s just the mysterious experience of an unexplained grace….

“And he lifted up his eyes on his disciples, and said: “Blessed are you who are poor, for yours is the kingdom of God. “Blessed are you who are hungry now, for you shall be satisfied. “Blessed are you who weep now, for you shall laugh.”  Luke 6:20-21 ESV.  So Eugene Peterson says it would help the modern mind to understand the radical nature of what Jesus is saying in this sermon on the plain if we hear it like this – [Lucky] are you who are poor, for yours is the kingdom of God. “[Lucky] are you who are hungry now, for you shall be satisfied. “[Lucky] are you who weep now, for you shall laugh.  Blessed has come to mean something very spiritual, very religious, very stained glass and closed in.  Maybe this is part why we like the word “blessed”, because after all, God blesses those who fear him and walk in his ways and curses those who don’t, right?   So, if we want to be blessed, we hold onto some kind of illusion that we can to something to somehow earn our blessedness, right?   And we’re all about our salvation by grace, except we all want to know the five steps we can take to earn it…

So why?   Why should this be?   Why would should it be that the hungry all the sudden be happy because something good is coming?  Why should the sad be happy because something good is coming.    You say I’m hungry and I’m sad and I’m poor, I’m just not very lucky.    Yet Jesus says you are.    Because something good is coming.   Why?   Because you’re just lucky enough to hear Jesus make his announcement.  And as our favorite apostle Paul tells us, “So faith comes from hearing, and hearing through the word of Christ.”  Romans 10:17 ESV.

Jesus says something good is coming.  If you think that’s for you, that’s also called faith, and it is.  Faith comes from hearing, and hearing through the word of Christ. and Christ speaks.   He says to you, you that are poor, you that are discontent, you that are dissatisfied, you that are mourning and sorrowful, you are lucky because something good is coming to you.

John Lewis

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Something Good is Coming

There’s something good coming.  We all go through hard times.  We all have struggles.  But we don’t give up hope.  Even in the midst of our trouble and hard times, we hang onto our hope.  We hope that something good is coming, for you and for me. There has to be something good coming.

Because we believe life to be good.   I know I believe life is good.  I mean, life, in its essence, is good.    Despite the fact that trouble comes and is present and is real, no matter how frequent and no matter how at times it may be horrible, we still believe this because trouble, no matter how frequent or horrible, is an anomaly.  Because life is created to be good.

Think about looking upon the face of a newborn child.  We might say “welcome to God’s good world”.   There will be trouble, there will be hard times, but it’s good…

Why do we believe this?   Why do we believe life is good?   We believe this because it’s what is told us in scripture about this God whom we worship and build our life around.   That in the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth.   He’s working the first day, he said it’s good.  The second day it’s good.  The third day he said it’s good twice.   Then the fourth day, fifth day, sixth day, he says it’s good.  Then at the very end he says ahhh….it’s very good.

So the even though we have trouble and hard times, we believe that somehow that is an anomaly, and that is not how life is ultimately meant to be.  And what we really believe is that God is going to be true to his declaration and God is going to intervene and break into our lives, and where it’s wrong he’s going to make it right, so we can say the something good is coming.

When God does this, when God breaks through and intervenes in the world to set what is wrong right, we call that the kingdom of God.  It’s the reign and rule of God, the government and policy of God, it’s the intervention of God.   It’s God coming among us to make things good again because that’s what he intends.

God accomplishes this chiefly and primarily through Christ.   The firstborn of all creation, the center of the cosmos creation and salvation.  “…. Jesus went into Galilee, proclaiming the good news of God. “The time has come,” he said. “The kingdom of God has come near. Repent and believe the good news!”” Mark 1:14-15 NIV.  When the human heart is aching for something better, when we have that hope, Jesus responds and says yes, that’s right!

So I want to say to everyone reading this today…something good is coming.   I want to say to myself, something good is coming.   It’s an announcement.  If you think it’s for you, it is.  If you don’t think that’s for you, it’s not.  But if you don’t think it’s for you, I want to say something to you – something good is coming!   Repent, rethink your life, and believe this good news that something good is coming.

For you.

John Lewis

Coming to the Table

If you pay attention, you may have noticed the frequency of these messages becoming less…frequent.   Sometimes we all go through certain struggles and challenges in doing things we think are important,  and i am going through some of those struggles in my spiritual life right now.  You might say I’m in a “dry spell”, a rut.   Not much is getting my attention these days.  It doesn’t mean it’s not still a priority to me, I am still spending my same time devoted to prayer and study every day.  It just means I need to get through it somehow, get to the other side, have an epiphany of sorts, maybe a Eureka! moment.   Whatever it is, I’m convinced the way through does not involve foregoing my prayer and meditation time.

That being said, I did have a moment in my church a week ago.  Our pastor shared in his message something regarding Mephibosheth, son of Jonathan, son of King Saul and friend of King David, so now I’m going to share this with you.

Just a quick backstory, David and Jonathan were kind of like best fiends, as much of best friends as you can be when Jonathan’s father wanted nothing more than to see David dead.   In fact, the Bible tells us that you could say Jonathan loved David as he loved himself – “Then Jonathan made a covenant with David, because he loved him as his own soul.” 1 Samuel 18:3 ESV.  Ultimately, King Saul and Jonathan both perish in the same battle (read about that in 1 Samual 31), and David is then anointed King of Judah (2 Samuel 2), then all of Israel (2 Samuel 5).

Fast forward again, David has won many battles and is having great success as King.   But he never forgets his friend Jonathan.   And David said, “Is there still anyone left of the house of Saul, that I may show him kindness for Jonathan’s sake?    Ultimately this question is answered by Ziba, a former servant of King Saul.   Ziba said to the king, “There is still a son of Jonathan; he is crippled in his feet.”   So David sends for Mephibosheth, son of Jonathan.   And you might imagine what’s going through the mind of Mephibosheth as the kings servants come calling.  In these days, it was normal for an incoming king to eliminate all potential threats to his crown.  As an heir in the line of King Saul, Mephibosheth may have been seen as such a threat.  So he probably thought it was curtains for him when King David sent for him.   Why else would the king be calling?

And Mephibosheth the son of Jonathan, son of Saul, came to David and fell on his face and paid homage. And David said, “Mephibosheth!” And he answered, “Behold, I am your servant.” And David said to him, “Do not fear, for I will show you kindness for the sake of your father Jonathan, and I will restore to you all the land of Saul your father, and you shall eat at my table always.” 

Do not fear David tells Mephibosheth.   Sounds like the angel of the Lord, or Jesus himself, all those time we are told Don’t be afraid.   So Do not fear.  Not only am I not going to kill you,  but I’m going to restore all the land that belonged to your grandfather.  I’m going to give all that you once had and thought you would have.  All that was lost when you lost your father and grandfather that day.   All that you could not acquire for yourself because of the accident that left you crippled.   Just because i loved your father Jonathan, I will show kindness to you, and you shall eat at my table always.

And he paid homage and said, “What is your servant, that you should show regard for a dead dog such as I?   I am hearing echoes of the psalms of David where it says to us “what is man that you are mindful of him, and the son of man that you care for him?” Psalms 8:4 ESV.  Who is Mephibosheth, but a crippled man hiding from the king out of fear.   What is man but a crippled spirit, hiding from the King out of fear of not being good enough, trying to convince ourselves that we are equal with Him?   Who is Mephibosheth that the King would seek him out for such extravagant treatment, that he might have all he would have had.  Who are we that God would seek us out while we are lost, while we are rebellious, and so extravagantly give of Himself that we might be restored to Himself?   That we might have all and be all that we were meant to?

And here’s the point my pastor made with this story – that we are all Mephibosheth.  We all are called by the king, yet when we come before him we come in fear and trembling, because we know what we deserve, yet we are told Don’t be afraid.   We limp before the king, crippled, battered and bruised by life.  We come before him and know that we are poor in spirit.   We limp before the king, expecting an angry God who wants to strike us down in the lightning cloud, and instead he invites to his table.

So Mephibosheth lived in Jerusalem, for he ate always at the king’s table. Now he was lame in both his feet.   And we sit at the table.   We sit at the King’s table, and we share a meal with him.  We bring our pain, our shame, our limp, our hurts, our habits, our hang ups.

We are called to the Kings table, but we can barely walk to get to it, can barely bring ourselves to approach.   We’ve heard the judgement, we’ve been told we don’t belong, we thought there was a gate around the table, and no way were we getting a key.   But the King calls, and we just focus on that.

We don’t know what to expect when we get there.   But not only does the King invite us go the table, always, to share a meal, but we get there and find that our King has become the meal.   “And he took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it and gave it to them, saying, “This is my body, which is given for you. Do this in remembrance of me.” And likewise the cup after they had eaten, saying, “This cup that is poured out for you is the new covenant in my blood.”  Luke 22:19-20 ESV.

So the invitation stands, the meal is always available.  We thought he would strike us down for all that was in our hearts, but instead of taking our lives, as we so expected and continue to expect, he gave up his own.  He gave up his own flesh and his own blood, gave us a new covenant.   And just as King David remembered his covenant with Jonathan and looked for anyone from the house of Saul to show kindness to,  so we remember God’s covenant with Abraham, and Jesus’ blood of the covenant, and we can know that he will always remember to show us kindness to his children.   We are always welcome at our King’s table.

And so I will remember.  Even though it’s been a struggle, I, like Mephibosheth, will always eat at the Kings table.   Doesn’t matter how I feel at the moment, doesn’t matter what someone says about me, doesn’t matter what you think about me.   It only matter what King Jesus says, and he says come to his table, and do this in remembrance of me.   I may be crippled, I might barely be able to get myself to the table, but my seat is saved.   I have my seat, and I will eat at the king’s table forever.  And i will keep coming to the table, spending time with the King in his word.   And maybe if I listen closely I will hear him say don’t be afraidyou shall eat at my table always.

And David said, “Is there still anyone left of the house of Saul, that I may show him kindness for Jonathan’s sake?” Now there was a servant of the house of Saul whose name was Ziba, and they called him to David. And the king said to him, “Are you Ziba?” And he said, “I am your servant.” And the king said, “Is there not still someone of the house of Saul, that I may show the kindness of God to him?” Ziba said to the king, “There is still a son of Jonathan; he is crippled in his feet.” The king said to him, “Where is he?” And Ziba said to the king, “He is in the house of Machir the son of Ammiel, at Lo-debar.” Then King David sent and brought him from the house of Machir the son of Ammiel, at Lo-debar. And Mephibosheth the son of Jonathan, son of Saul, came to David and fell on his face and paid homage. And David said, “Mephibosheth!” And he answered, “Behold, I am your servant.” And David said to him, “Do not fear, for I will show you kindness for the sake of your father Jonathan, and I will restore to you all the land of Saul your father, and you shall eat at my table always.” And he paid homage and said, “What is your servant, that you should show regard for a dead dog such as I?” Then the king called Ziba, Saul’s servant, and said to him, “All that belonged to Saul and to all his house I have given to your master’s grandson. And you and your sons and your servants shall till the land for him and shall bring in the produce, that your master’s grandson may have bread to eat. But Mephibosheth your master’s grandson shall always eat at my table.” Now Ziba had fifteen sons and twenty servants. Then Ziba said to the king, “According to all that my lord the king commands his servant, so will your servant do.” So Mephibosheth ate at David’s table, like one of the king’s sons. And Mephibosheth had a young son, whose name was Mica. And all who lived in Ziba’s house became Mephibosheth’s servants. So Mephibosheth lived in Jerusalem, for he ate always at the king’s table. Now he was lame in both his feet.”

2 Samuel 9:1-13 ESV

http://bible.com/59/2sa.9.1-13.esv

“Jonathan, the son of Saul, had a son who was crippled in his feet. He was five years old when the news about Saul and Jonathan came from Jezreel, and his nurse took him up and fled, and as she fled in her haste, he fell and became lame. And his name was Mephibosheth.”

2 Samuel 4:4 ESV

http://bible.com/59/2sa.4.4.esv

“Then Jonathan made a covenant with David, because he loved him as his own soul.”

1 Samuel 18:3 ESV

http://bible.com/59/1sa.18.3.esv

John Lewis

Jesus is Sleeping

The lectionary gospel reading from a couple of weeks ago was Mark 4:35-41, or as the ESV so simply captions it, “Jesus Calms A Storm”.    It’s the culmination of a day on which Jesus has given many parables and much teaching, and occurs as Jesus and his disciples are on the way to the region of Gerasenes, where Jesus will heal a demon possessed man.

As I read and prayed through this last week, it occurred to me that I was in the boat on the lake.   Not literally of course, but I might as well be.   I know that, right now, just like Moses wandering the wilderness for forty years, Joshua looking into his promised land, A young shepherd named David fighting to keep the lions and the bears away from his flock,  just as in all these stories, where I am is not where I’m going.  Just as Jesus and his disciples, in the boat crossing from one side to the other, where they are is not where they are going.

But just as Jesus disciples feared as water filled their boat, sometimes I just get the feeling that my boat is about to sink.

On that day, when evening had come, he said to them, “Let us go across to the other side.” And leaving the crowd, they took him with them in the boat, just as he was. And other boats were with him. And a great windstorm arose, and the waves were breaking into the boat, so that the boat was already filling. But he was in the stern, asleep on the cushion.  They are on their journey across the lake, Jesus is with them, but somehow that boat is filling up quicker that they can get the water out of there.  And their boat will sink, without some divine intervention.   But he was in the stern, asleep on the cushion. And they woke him and said to him, “Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing?” 

And I think that is where I am in this journey right now.   I’m in the boat, Jesus is there with me, but the boat is sinking.  And Jesus is sleeping.   From the outside, all is well.  Got the “cool job”, great family, wife, and kids.

But the boat is sinking.   And Jesus is sleeping.  Ever feel like you’re surrounded by people all the time, but still all alone.  The water is crashing over the sides, I’m scooping as fast as I can.  But the pump ain’t working, and I just can’t keep up.  And Jesus is sleeping.

Does he not care that I’m perishing?   Is he just going to let this boat sink?   He might be able to walk on water, but I’m not able yet.  Guess I don’t have enough faith…

And he awoke and rebuked the wind and said to the sea, “Peace! Be still!” And the wind ceased, and there was a great calm. He said to them, “Why are you so afraid? Have you still no faith?” And they were filled with great fear and said to one another, “Who then is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?   Why am I so afraid?   Where I am is not where I’m going, but it sure is rough out on this lake.  I’m on a journey somewhere, but I don’t know where.   I’m out on the lake, I have a boat, even have Jesus in the boat.  But Jesus is sleeping.

But, Why are you so afraid? Have you still no faith?   I know who he is.   I know he has the power to calm this little storm that I’m in.   But it sure would be nice if he would wake up already.   Maybe, like a certain father of a demon possessed boy, he could help me believe even through my unbelief.   “So they brought the boy. But when the evil spirit saw Jesus, it threw the child into a violent convulsion, and he fell to the ground, writhing and foaming at the mouth. “How long has this been happening?” Jesus asked the boy’s father. He replied, “Since he was a little boy. The spirit often throws him into the fire or into water, trying to kill him. Have mercy on us and help us, if you can.” “What do you mean, ‘If I can’?” Jesus asked. “Anything is possible if a person believes.” The father instantly cried out, “I do believe, but help me overcome my unbelief!””  Mark 9:20-24 NLT.

Does it ever feel like the boat is sinking?   Or am I the only one?   Lord Jesus, I’m in a storm.   The boat is filling up, and I just can’t keep up.   I’m asking you to wake up.  I know you can calm the wind and the seas.  In you I do believe.

But, Lord Jesus, I need you to wake up, and help me to overcome my unbelief.

“On that day, when evening had come, he said to them, “Let us go across to the other side.” And leaving the crowd, they took him with them in the boat, just as he was. And other boats were with him. And a great windstorm arose, and the waves were breaking into the boat, so that the boat was already filling. But he was in the stern, asleep on the cushion. And they woke him and said to him, “Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing?” And he awoke and rebuked the wind and said to the sea, “Peace! Be still!” And the wind ceased, and there was a great calm. He said to them, “Why are you so afraid? Have you still no faith?” And they were filled with great fear and said to one another, “Who then is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?””

Mark 4:35-41 ESV