Lord of All

Keeping it light today, we’ll get more heavy into this later on, but we are going to dive deep into those waters Jesus walked on so long ago.

The very next night after the feeding of the five thousand, Jesus is doing another of his great miracles.  He’s fed the masses, escaped those same masses who wanted to make him king by force, sent his disciples across the Sea on a boat, and gone up the mountain and prayed by himself.  And now his disciples are in trouble, out on the sea, and here comes Jesus, walking on water to come to them.

This is not Jesus doing tricks.  It’s not even primarily a miracle, although it’s obviously miraculous.  No, it’s a sign.  That’s what John wants you to know, he’s been telling us repeatedly.  He never uses the word miracle, he calls these signs.   But what does this sign point to?   There are only  seven signs in John’s gospel, which is very few.  Matthew, Mark and Luke have dozens, but John only has seven.  And what does this sign of Jesus walking on the water in the middle of the dark and stormy night point us to?

In many different ways, it’s pointing to this, and we will work it out, but it’s pointing to this – Jesus is Lord.

Jesus walks to the disciples in the middle of their storm, he walks to us in the middle of our storms, and he is Lord of all, even the winds and the waves and the sea.   Think about it.
 
“When evening came, his disciples went down to the sea, got into a boat, and started across the sea to Capernaum. It was now dark, and Jesus had not yet come to them. The sea became rough because a strong wind was blowing. When they had rowed about three or four miles, they saw Jesus walking on the sea and coming near the boat, and they were frightened. But he said to them, “It is I; do not be afraid.” Then they were glad to take him into the boat, and immediately the boat was at the land to which they were going.”  John‬ ‭6:16-21‬ ‭ESV‬‬.  
 

 

John Lewis
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Oh, What a Night

Oh, What a Night


“When evening came, his disciples went down to the sea, got into a boat, and started across the sea to Capernaum. It was now dark, and Jesus had not yet come to them. The sea became rough because a strong wind was blowing. When they had rowed about three or four miles, they saw Jesus walking on the sea and coming near the boat, and they were frightened. But he said to them, “It is I; do not be afraid.” Then they were glad to take him into the boat, and immediately the boat was at the land to which they were going.”  John‬ ‭6:16-21‬ ‭ESV‬‬.

The fifth of the seven signs of Johns’s Gospel, given to us so that we can believe in Jesus in a right way and have life in His name. And yes, it was a dark and stormy night.
 
Jesus has fed the five thousand.  They are on the eastern, more desolate, more Gentile side of the Sea of Galilee.  Jesus lives in Capernaum, that’s on the west side.  That’s where Bethsaida is, and the towns where Jesus is doing most of his ministry.   Jesus and his disciples had gone to the other side, and the multitudes had gathered to Jesus because they were hungering for his word.  And, as we know, he gave them the bread of his word, but then miraculously fed the multitudes with just a few loaves and s couple of fish.   He fed them until they were full, seconds and thirds, until they could eat no more, he just keeps pulling the bread and the fish, and when they were done there are twelve baskets left over.    

As a result of this,  the multitudes wanted to make Jesus king, by force.  They wanted to forcibly make Jesus king.  Of course, Jesus IS king.  That’s what Messiah means.  He comes to be king, he IS king.   Yet Jesus declines this effort by the multitude, he slips away by himself to the mountain to pray.  Why does he do this?   Because Jesus does not come to be a forceful king.  They were still stuck in their paradigm of scarcity.  They wanted Jesus to lead their forces, maintaining their distorted view of scarcity.  They wanted Jesus to lead their forces to make sure they had their slice of the pie.  They couldn’t understand that what Jesus wants to show them is the beauty of the infinite, that in the Christ way there is enough for everyone.

So Jesus slips away into the mountain by himself to pray.  He sends his disciples back to Capernaum, their base.  He sends them by boat, because they are fishermen and they have a boat.  After all, it’s only seven miles across the Sea of Galilee by boat.  To walk around is much longer and takes much more time.    So Jesus sends his disciples by boat across the Sea of Galilee, the quickest way.  Did Jesus know what he was going to do?  I would think so, he seems to be setting something up here.

So it’s a dark and stormy night, and the disciples are heading across the Sea.  It’s dark, they have no modern lighting, it’s very dark, maybe they had a couple lanterns.  And out in the middle of the night in the middle of the Sea in the middle of the storm, Jesus comes to the disciples walking on the water.   Imagine this.  There is a dramatic situation.  There is a storm, people struggling against the storm.  People being very aware of their own mortality at the moment.  The situation could get really ugly if the storm gets any worse. They are in circumstances I imagine they don’t like, and here comes Jesus just strolling across the sea!!   
 
Can you imagine walking on water?  I think we can all imagine this.  We can imagine it, we just can’t do it.  But maybe, just maybe, walking on water is something we are supposed to be able to do, but we just don’t know how.  Maybe this is not miraculous at all.  Just like swimming, we don’t learn to swim without someone showing us how, maybe in the age to come Jesus will be there giving his free walking on water classes.  C’mon, this is how you do it!!   Who know???
 
But here comes Jesus, walking on water in the middle of the night, and the reaction is not calm or joyous.  It’s not “Hey, Look, it’s Jesus, walking in the water!”  The disciples are frightened, even terrified.  Matthew and Mark both tell us the disciples said “It’s a ghost!!”   What else would they think?  What would you think?   To see a human figure moving toward you, walking across the top of the water, in the middle of the sea, on a dark and stormy night.  It would seem death is so close the ghosts are already here.   

But he said to them, “It is I; do not be afraid.”   That’s a relief.  Then they were glad to take him into the boat.   Wouldn’t you be glad to hear it was Jesus and receive him into your boat?   In the middle of the Sea on a dark and stormy night with the winds blowing and the waves crashing, knowing you could go down at any time, so close to death the ghosts are already coming.  How glad would you be to hear Jesus say It is I; do not be afraid.   
 
In the middle of the dark and stormy night, the voice of Jesus is heard.  “It’s me!  Don’t be afraid.”   Remember, the disciples were in the middle of the Sea of Galilee, they had rowed about three or four miles, and it’s about a seven mile journey across that sea.  But Jesus comes to them in the middle of the Sea, Then they were glad to take him into the boat, and immediately the boat was at the land to which they were going.   Bump!  They take Jesus in, and immediately they arrive st their destination on the other side.  Immediately they are through the storm.   They hit ground, and they are at Capernaum.  What happened?   They are just there.  Oh, what a night indeed.   Think about it.  Jesus goes straight from feeding the five thousand to slipping away from the crowd wanting to make him king to going up the mountain to pray, straight to the middle of the Sea of Galilee, walking on water to deliver his disciples from the storm.
 
Of course, it’s not just a miracle, it’s a sign.   A sign pointing us to Jesus, who is Lord, even of the Sea.
 
More to come.
 
John Lewis

Flesh and Blood


Taking a quick break from looking at each “sign” given to us in the Gospel of John to look at a scene which occurs on the very next day following the feeding of the five thousand in John chapter 6.  It’s a place where Jesus gives us his very own theology of what we now call communion.  It’s funny, I’ve heard many different explanations from many different people about what communion means to them, no one ever references John chapter 6.

It is the the very next day following the feeding by the Sea of Galilee, and many of those who had eaten return, looking for more bread from the Son of God.   

They come looking for Jesus, saying “give us some more bread.”  Jesus says ‘I’ll give you bread.  I’m going to give you the bread of my flesh to eat.  Eat my flesh and drink my blood.”   To which those who came to him said “What are you talking about??!!  Have you lost your mind?  We’re Jews, we’re kosher.  We’re not cannibals!!”   Jesus says “Truly, truly I say to you, unless you eat my flesh and drink my blood you have no life in you.  You are stuck in this little sphere of the finite and you’ve got to break into the infinite.  My flesh and my blood are your way into the infinite.”

He says it like this –


“The Jews then disputed among themselves, saying, “How can this man give us his flesh to eat?” So Jesus said to them, “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you. Whoever feeds on my flesh and drinks my blood has [infinite] eternal life, and I will raise him up on the last day. For my flesh is true food, and my blood is true drink. Whoever feeds on my flesh and drinks my blood abides in me, and I in him. As the living Father sent me, and I live because of the Father, so whoever feeds on me, he also will live because of me. This is the bread that came down from heaven, not like the bread the fathers ate, and died. Whoever feeds on this bread will live [infinitely] forever.” Jesus said these things in the synagogue, as he taught at Capernaum.”  John‬ ‭6:52-59‬ ‭ESV‬‬


It is the beauty of the infinite.  This follows the very next day from the sign of the feeding of the five thousand.  It’s a sign that we can connect by faith with the word made flesh, and this opens us up to the infinite.  So when we stand and come to the table, we eat the bread of the infinite, and drink the wine of the infinite, because it is the connecting point.  We come to the table, and we find the body and blood of Jesus.   It’s where infinite is communicated to finite.  We eat the bread and drink the cup and we connect with the infinite.  Do you believe we can connect with the infinite, and have eternal, infinite life?  And that it begins to change us, not when we die (it will change us then too), but it changes us now, and we begin to live completely different lives.   Jesus calls us out out of our fear and into faith, to believe in him and thus to connect with the infinite…
John Lewis

The Horses of History

The Horses of History
And now to finish out what I have to say (finally) about Jesus feeding the multitudes…
 
First…the paragraph I finished with last time.

Jesus says we don’t have to stay down here in the finite sphere worried and fighting.  We can trust in God and connect with the beauty of the infinite.  This is the life where trust replaces fear and faith replaces force.  This is the life that the sign of the feeding of the five thousand points us to.  It’s the life that we want to live.  It’s the life of peace.  But it’s challenging to enter into.  You can do it, but the fear of scarcity, the paradigm of insufficiency, the drive for economic self preservation is the greatest hindrance to entering into the Kingdom of God.

The people that have the hardest time connecting with that connecting point between the infinite heaven and our finite creation are not the poor down here, but the rich.   The rich that have few more of those grains in the hourglass.   I mean, the rich have twelve grains of sand, and after all, the poor only have one.  But, it is just twelve grains… Jesus says it’s hard for the rich to understand that there is the infinite provision of God…”How difficult it is for those who have wealth to enter the kingdom of God!”  ‭‭Luke‬ ‭18:24‬ ‭ESV‬‬, because they are so locked into their paradigm of scarcity and insufficiency.

We are dominated by our paradigm of scarcity, and we fear there will never be enough.  So we are committed to maintaining economic self preservation by force, and this is the way of Cain.  The force maintaining our economic self preservation is where we place our faith, and it’s idolatrous.  I’ll say it again.  The force maintaining our economic self preservation is where we place our faith, and it’s idolatrous…

What happens is, when we operate within our paradigm of scarcity and we put our faith in force to forcibly preserve ours, this creates competition.  Competition leads to conflict.   Conflict leads to conquest.  Conquest leads to resentment because people tend not to like to be conquered (go figure).  Resentment leads to retaliation and rebellion, and that leads to war.  And the whole thing becomes one big self-fulfilling prophecy that there is not enough because we squander it fighting one another…

Because we are dominated by our paradigm of scarcity, it leads to competition.  Competition leads to conflict, conflict leads to conquest, and people don’t like to be conquered and this leads to resentment, and then rebellion, and then retaliation and war, which leads to the self-fulfilling prophecy of scarcity and lack, also known as the haves and the have-nots.   Now what do we have?  Maybe you can recognize the four horseman of the apocalypse

The white horse of conquest.  Followed by the red horse of war.  Followed by the black horse of scarcity (or famine).  Followed by the pale horse of death.  People ask “Do you think those horses are about to ride?”  They’ve been galloping across human history several times a century since history began!!!!   And Jesus wants to SAVE us from the stupid cycle of the stupid four horseman!   He wants to save us from this cycle where we have conquest, we conquer, but people don’t like to be conquered.  So as soon as they get a little power and some kind of leader they retaliate, and that leads to WAR, which is the worst squandering of human resources, and it turns into that self-fulfilling prophecy of Look there’s not enough!  

Yeah, because you spent it all killing each other.  Of course there’s not enough now.  And in the end it’s always that pale horse that rides across history.  Jesus says, “Let’s do something else, because this isn’t working!   I’ve come to save you.”  Jesus came to save us from the stupid cycle of conquest, war, famine, and death.  Conquest, war, famine, and death. Conquest, war, famine, and death.   That’s human history.

The miracle of the the loaves and fishes is a sign pointing us to Jesus in a new way, but do we have eyes to see it, do we have faith to believe it?   Perceiving then that they were about to come and take him by force to make him king, Jesus withdrew again to the mountain by himself.   We call him Lord Jesus Christ.   Christ means Messiah, Messiah means King.  Christ is King.  Jesus is the King.  Yet they come to make him king, and he runs off to hide.  What’s happening here?  The key word here is force.  Perceiving then that they were about to come and take him by force…the crowd wants to take Jesus by force to make him their forceful king to lead their forces.  This is exactly what Jesus will not do.  Jesus will not ride the white horse of forceful conquest, because that leads to the red horse of war, that leads to the black horse of famine, and that leads to the pale horse of death, and that’s what Jesus came to SAVE us from, not ride.
 
The Kingdom of Christ is without force.  It’s persuaded by love, spirit, witness, reason, rhetoric, and if need be laying down our lives, martyrdom.  Because we love not our lives, even to the point of death.  But never by force.  The kingdom of God does not come by winning the game of force in our finite sphere.  The kingdom of God comes by, in faith, connecting to Jesus Christ, and thus to the beauty of the infinite.

The Word became flesh and blood.  The Word didn’t become an idea, the Word didn’t become a theory, the Word didn’t become a sermon.  The Word became flesh and blood.  The flesh and blood of Jesus is the connecting point of the finite and the infinite.   I’ve used the word infinite, but the Bible uses another word for this, it’s called eternal life.  Instead of infinite, I could have used the words eternal life.  But I want to bring it in a fresh new way.  In the beginning was the infinite, the infinite was with God, the infinite was God, and the infinite became finite flesh and blood, lived among us, and we beheld the beauty of the infinite.

The beauty of the infinite.  It’s a sign.  It’s not just Jesus giving lunch one time.  It’s a sign that we can connect by faith with the word made flesh, and that opens us up to the infinite.

 

“After this Jesus went away to the other side of the Sea of Galilee, which is the Sea of Tiberias. And a large crowd was following him, because they saw the signs that he was doing on the sick. Jesus went up on the mountain, and there he sat down with his disciples. Now the Passover, the feast of the Jews, was at hand. Lifting up his eyes, then, and seeing that a large crowd was coming toward him, Jesus said to Philip, “Where are we to buy bread, so that these people may eat?” He said this to test him, for he himself knew what he would do. Philip answered him, “Two hundred denarii worth of bread would not be enough for each of them to get a little.” One of his disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother, said to him, “There is a boy here who has five barley loaves and two fish, but what are they for so many?” Jesus said, “Have the people sit down.” Now there was much grass in the place. So the men sat down, about five thousand in number. Jesus then took the loaves, and when he had given thanks, he distributed them to those who were seated. So also the fish, as much as they wanted. And when they had eaten their fill, he told his disciples, “Gather up the leftover fragments, that nothing may be lost.” So they gathered them up and filled twelve baskets with fragments from the five barley loaves left by those who had eaten. When the people saw the sign that he had done, they said, “This is indeed the Prophet who is to come into the world!” Perceiving then that they were about to come and take him by force to make him king, Jesus withdrew again to the mountain by himself.”
‭‭John‬ ‭6:1-15‬ ‭ESV‬‬
 

 

John Lewis

Sands in the Hourglass

The fourth sign in Johns Gospel tells us this – we no longer live in a zero based, closed system universe.  In the incarnation, the Infinite has made contact with the finite…

Imagine.  Imagine you are holding an hourglass.   You know an hourglass.  It’s a simple concept.  It contains two spheres, one is full, one is empty, one is above, one is beneath.  Two spheres, connected at a single point.   They look like they are each self contained, but they are not.  As we know, they are two spheres, self contained, except they are connected at a single point.   The problem with this illustration is the hourglass is made up of two spheres of equal size.  What you really need to imagine is one small sphere down bottom, this is us on earth, another sphere on top, this is heaven.  This is finite, this is infinite.  This is man’s domain, this is God’s.  

But for the top, you have to imagine a sphere the size of the room you are sitting in.  Well, not as big as the room you are sitting in, as big as your town.    Except not as big as Prince Frederick or Annapolis or Baltimore, but a sphere as big as the whole world.  Except bigger than the world, as big as the Milky Way galaxy.  Except not as big as the galaxy, as big as the universe.  Except even the universe can’t contain that sphere on top…because it’s infinite.   Infinite…  

But between our finite and heavens infinite, we have a point.  A point where the sand flows through the hourglass, the point where the two spheres meet, the one is finite, the other being infinite.  We have this point where the infinite is connected to the finite.  And from his fullness we have all received…Our problem is that we are convinced we are empty.  We live in our little sphere on the bottom of that hourglass, and we are convinced our lower sphere called earth is finite and it’s not enough..  And so we live down here, and in that upper sphere they watch and say “Oh look, they’re having a nice little war down here.  It’s like capture the flag except they’re really killing each other.”  They’re having a war down here, because they don’t know anything about the infinite upper sphere of the hourglass, or if they do know it exists they think it’s completely separate…

But “In the beginning was the [infinite], and the [infinite] was with God, and the [infinite] was God….“And the [infinite] became [finite] and dwelt among us, and we have seen his glory…”.  John‬ ‭1:1,14‬ ‭ESV‬‬.   And we beheld the beauty of the infinite…

There is a place where the infinite of God connects the finite of man, and it is called Jesus Christ.   Because he is infinite and he is finite.  He is infinite God and he is finite man.  He is the connecting point between the two spheres, and through Jesus Christ God is pouring his love, his fullness, his grace, he’s pouring his infinite beauty into the world.  The connecting point is Jesus Christ.  For you to connect with the connecting point is called faith.  It’s called believing…

The universe is not a closed system.  Christ is the single point at which the infinity of God is poured into the finite creation.  We don’t have to fight down here.  We can connect with Christ, and thus the infinite.   This is why Jesus constantly tells us not to worry about scarcity but to trust in God.   Did you ever hear him say that?  He says it all the time.  Come on, think about the birds, think about the lilies of the field.  Why are you troubled?  Why are you worried?  YOUR FATHER IS INFINITE.  And he cares for you!  And he’s not on vacation, he’s not way off beyond the stars, he is pouring himself into the world through me!!!

Jesus says we don’t have to stay down here in the finite sphere worried and fighting.  We can trust in God and connect with the beauty of the infinite.  This is the life where trust replaces fear and faith replaces force.  This is the life that the sign of the feeding of the five thousand points us to.  It’s the life that we want to live.  It’s the life of peace.  But it’s challenging to enter into.  You can do it, but the fear of scarcity, the paradigm of insufficiency, the drive for economic self preservation is the greatest hindrance to entering into the Kingdom of God.

Still more to say..

 

“After this Jesus went away to the other side of the Sea of Galilee, which is the Sea of Tiberias. And a large crowd was following him, because they saw the signs that he was doing on the sick. Jesus went up on the mountain, and there he sat down with his disciples. Now the Passover, the feast of the Jews, was at hand. Lifting up his eyes, then, and seeing that a large crowd was coming toward him, Jesus said to Philip, “Where are we to buy bread, so that these people may eat?” He said this to test him, for he himself knew what he would do. Philip answered him, “Two hundred denarii worth of bread would not be enough for each of them to get a little.” One of his disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother, said to him, “There is a boy here who has five barley loaves and two fish, but what are they for so many?” Jesus said, “Have the people sit down.” Now there was much grass in the place. So the men sat down, about five thousand in number. Jesus then took the loaves, and when he had given thanks, he distributed them to those who were seated. So also the fish, as much as they wanted. And when they had eaten their fill, he told his disciples, “Gather up the leftover fragments, that nothing may be lost.” So they gathered them up and filled twelve baskets with fragments from the five barley loaves left by those who had eaten. When the people saw the sign that he had done, they said, “This is indeed the Prophet who is to come into the world!” Perceiving then that they were about to come and take him by force to make him king, Jesus withdrew again to the mountain by himself.”
‭‭John‬ ‭6:1-15‬ ‭ESV‬‬
 


John Lewis

I Shall Not Want

I Shall Not Want

So Jesus is giving is a sign as to just how mistaken we are when we go through life believing there is just not enough for us and for them, for me and for you, for mine and for yours…

We are back in Galilee.  The multitudes are coming to Jesus, and it is a beautiful thing.  The setting is beautiful in Galilee.  Grassy slopes rising up from the Sea of Galilee, and the people were coming to Jesus in great numbers.   And Jesus is teaching them, and of course he was teaching one and one thing only, the Kingdom of God.  He was teaching them the way that their creator, whom He calls his Abba, his Father, intends for human beings to live.  It’s an alternative social structure.  It’s not a social structure based upon systemic sin, it’s a social structure based in love.  

Because this government of God, this reign and rule of God, is only constrained by two laws.  Love God with all your heart, soul, mind and strength.  Love your neighbor as yourself.   The cynic will say, and maybe you agree, that you just can’t build a society around that kind of law and structure.  But Jesus says, “Oh, yes you can!”  And this is exactly what it is that Jesus teaches and preaches.   

We’re told that it was Passover.  There were three Passovers in John’s Gospel.  It is from John because of this that we get that Jesus’ ministry lasts 2 1/2 – 3 years, we don’t get that from Matthew, Luke or Mark.   If we only read the synoptic gospels, we might think Jesus’ ministry only lasted about a year, but it’s from John that we see it lasted 2 1/2 – 3 years, still a very short public ministry.   On the first Passover, Jesus had gone to Jerusalem, and events there had created some trouble for him.  

Now, it is the second Passover, and Jesus does not go to Jerusalem for the Passover because of death threats.  He’d been there for an earlier festival, probably Hanukkah, the Festival of Lights, and there were death threats.  It says he was not going back to Judea because the Judeans were seeking to  kill him.   When the third Passover comes around, Jesus will go to Jerusalem, and he will be killed.

So it was Passover time, but Jesus was staying in Galilee.  Passover is a Jewish table rite.  It is remembering how God delivered the Israelites out of their slavery in Egypt, and how God provided for them with the manna from heaven through the long journey to the promised land, a land flowing with milk and honey.   Jesus will take that Passover meal, and he’s going to innovate.  He’s going to rework it into what we call communion.  John gives us the Eucharistic theology of Jesus at the end of this chapter.

So we’re on a grassy hillside listening to Jesus teach about the government and social structure of God.  He’s teaching how God wants the world arranged.  Not how Cain and Pharaoh and Caesar and all those want it, but how God wants it.

Then he turns to one of his disciples, Phillip, and asks him Where are we to buy bread, so that these people may eat?    These people have needs.  They can’t just live on my words.  They are human beings.  They need bread, maybe more.   Where are we to buy bread to feed these multitudes?  He said this to test him, for he himself knew what he would do.  And of course Phillip answers, probably much as we would, Two hundred denarii worth of bread would not be enough for each of them to get a little.    Phillip breaks out the calculator and figures out it would take at least $12,000 to feed them all.   So Andrew, Peter’s brother, speaks up.  There is a boy here who has five barley loaves and two fish, but what are they for so many?   Andrew immediately feels silly for saying out loud that a little boy has five barley loaves and two fish for such a vast multitude of people.  When he hears himself say it out loud, and there’s such multitude of people, but what is five barley loaves and two little fish for so many people???   But it turns out he’s onto something.  

Jesus said, “Have the people sit down.”   Jesus says, I think we can work with this.  Have everybody sit down.   Now there was much grass in the place.   Let them sit down in the green grass of this lovely place.  Now let’s go back to Psalm 23.   What does it say?   “The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want.   I shall not…what?  I shall not…come up lacking.  I shall not be insufficient.  I shall not be the victim of scarcity.  I shall not…not have enough.   “The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want.  He makes me lie down in green pastures. He leads me beside still waters.”   We should see that the Shepherd is present here.   He sees these people as his flock, and the Shepherd knows he needs to feed his flock, so he has the sit down.  So the men sat down, about five thousand in number. Jesus then took the loaves, and when he had given thanks, he distributed them to those who were seated. So also the fish, as much as they wanted.   The little boys lunch of five barley loaves and two fishes are given to him, he takes them he gives thanks to the Father.  He gives a prayer, thanking God that he is the provider.  He gives a prayer of thanksgiving, because God is the king of the universe, God brings forth bread from the earth.  Jesus blesses the meal, and begins to give it to the disciples, bread and fish, bread and fish, bread and fish….Jesus then took the loaves, and when he had given thanks, he distributed them to those who were seated. So also the fish, as much as they wanted.   He keeps reaching into the basket.   It seems as though he keeps reaching, but where’s he reaching to?   There’s five to start with, but He’s reaching into something that seems to be infinite.   How long does it take to distribute 1, 2 ,3, 4, 5 barley loaves and 1, 2 fish?   One, two,  three, four, five, six, seven, you should be done, but he’s not.  It just keeps coming.  Where’s he pulling from?   He keeps passing it out, giving it to the disciples, and the twelve are passing it out.   And it just keeps coming.  Maybe this is not a closed system after all.  It just keeps coming, He keeps reaching in and giving and giving, and he’s giving, and he’s giving….

It’s his first hands on miracle.  Water to wine, the healing of the officials son, the healing by the pool are all spoken word miracles, but Jesus has got his hands on the bread and the fish.   He’s giving out these McFish sandwiches, there you go.   And people start eating.  And they have seconds, some have thirds.  They’re not worried about their low carb diet, they just want more bread!  They eat and they’re happy and they’re having a good time, and they eat until they are filled.  And when they had eaten their fill, he told his disciples, “Gather up the leftover fragments, that nothing may be lost.” So they gathered them up and filled twelve baskets with fragments from the five barley loaves left by those who had eaten. 

They eat until they are filled.  Jesus says let’s not let anything go to waste, let’s take up the leftovers.   So from the leftovers of five barley loaves and two fish that had fed five thousand men plus women and children, there is now gathered up of the leftovers twelve baskets full.   When the people saw the sign that he had done, they said, “This is indeed the Prophet who is to come into the world!”    Of course it’s a sign.  And of course it’s twelve baskets full.  It’s a sign of Israel being reconstituted.  Twelve tribes.  Twelve apostles.  Twelve, the number of God’s people.  There’s twelve baskets full, and John tells us this is what the Kingdom of God looks like!  The kingdom of Cain says there’s not enough!  We’re convinced there’s not enough!  There are only five loaves and two fish, and there’s not enough, and you better believe we’re gonna fight, because  I’m taking four…and both the fish!!!  Here, you can have this little loaf, I’m getting mine over here.   If you try to take mine, there’s going to be trouble…

And Jesus gives us a sign, another way.  There’s another way.  You’ve been lied to.   You’ve been told there’s not enough, but there is.  You’ve been lied to.  You’ve been told that scarcity and insufficiency is the paradigm through which you must view the world, but it’s a lie…

The fourth sign in Johns Gospel tells us this – we no longer live in a zero based, closed system universe.  In the incarnation, the Infinite has made contact with the finite…
 
So much more to say…
 

 

John Lewis

There’s Just Not Enough

There’s Just Not Enough

Back to the feeding of the five thousand.
 
In John’s poetic prologue to his gospel, which is so important, John tells us something about the beauty of the Infinite entering into the finite.   “And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we have seen his glory, glory as of the only Son from the Father, full of grace and truth….For from his fullness we have all received, grace upon grace.”  ‭‭John‬ ‭1:14, 16‬ ‭ESV‬‬.  The word became flesh, we are told.   The logos became human, incarnation.  Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we have seen his glory…this word could also be understood as beauty.   We have seen his [beauty], the beauty of a Fathers only Son, full of grace and truth….For from his fullness we have all received, grace upon grace.   

From the fullness of Christ we have all received grace upon grace.   But the human condition, as a problem, suffers from a kind of emptiness.   We can ask the question What’s wrong with us?   There are many ways we can answer this question, but one of the ways we can answer this question is to say we suffer from a kind of emptiness.  Not just spiritual emptiness, there’s that too, but we live with a pervasive mentality of scarcity and insufficiency, this is very important.   We are infected in the way we think about life itself.

As human beings, we can only survive in a social structure, our lives are intensely social by necessity.  So here we are, thrust into this social structure that is the human condition, but we come with a problem.  Or at least as young children we are scripted in such a way, unknowingly, that there’s just not enough.  There’s not enough to go around.   There’s not enough for everyone, you know?   This, really, shapes the way we view the world in a very negative way.  There’s just not enough.   So we have a paradigm of scarcity and insufficiency.   There’s not enough, because there’s just not.  So I have to make sure there’s enough for me and mine, because there’s just not enough.

So this is our problem.  Why did Cain kill Abel?  Seriously, why did Cain kill Abel?   Was it because he thought there just wasn’t enough?   Was there not enough land?   There’s not enough land for Cain’s crops and Abel’s flocks, at least that’s what Cain thought.  So Cain has to get rid of the competition, even though it’s  his brother.

We are the sons and daughters of Cain.  It is not Abel’s legacy that we have inherited as a human species, but Cain’s legacy.  Certainly we are the sons and daughters of Cain, why else do we covet and why do we fight and why do we exploit?   Because we view the world through Cain’s lens of scarcity and insufficiency.   We don’t see ourselves as blessed with abundance, we perceive ourselves as cursed with scarcity, so we’re afraid.  We’re afraid of the void, we’re afraid of emptiness, we’re afraid of insufficiency, we’re afraid of empty bellies, we’re afraid that there’s just not enough.

We are raised to believe that reality is zero-based, and that creation is a closed system.  I don’t think we are formally taught that at any point (although I do work in sales and deal with a company that absolutely believes in the concept of zero-based budgeting…so maybe the world is starting to formally encode this belief).   At some point philosophy may creep into exploring this line of thought, but by the time we are three years old we already know this.   We may not know any of the words at three years old, but we certainly are raised to believe that reality is zero-based, and creation is a closed system.  Or, as we might say, that it is finite, that creation is limited.

Now we are getting to it.  The jumping off point I spoke of previously.  This paradigm of scarcity and insufficiency lies at the heart of our systemic sins.   Stay with me here.  There are personal sins, and that is what we mostly focus on,  because we feel so hopeless in doing anything about our systemic sins. But the real problems of humanity stem not from our personal sins, but from our sins as a whole, as a human race.   As human beings, as we build our societies, we build them in sinful ways.  No one person or group is responsible, but are are all culpable in it.   We are all implicated.  It’s because of our paradigm of scarcity and insufficiency that we build systems that are in and of themselves sinful.

We fear that there won’t be enough oil.  There won’t be enough land.  There won’t be enough food.  There won’t be enough water.  There won’t be enough money.  There won’t be enough labor to go around, so we build and maintain sinful structure to guarantee that WE have OURS.   We fear that there’s not going to enough for us, however we define US, so we use force against THEM, to guarantee we have enough for US.

Still with me?  Try.  We create an organized, slow motion version of anarchy.  You know anarchy, think of lawlessness, the rule of law thrown out the window, it’s every man for himself, people are smashing windows, just grabbing whatever they can.  Think about times during riots when suddenly when all law and order dissolves, it’s pandemonium,  it’s anarchy, the zombie apacolypse comes upon us…

What we have done in our systemic sins is to create a slow-motion version of anarchy.  We don’t recognize it for what it is because it takes place over decades or centuries.  Native Americans were victims of the slow motion, organized anarchy known as Manifest Destiny.   Just grab what you can and the rest will just have to get by as best they can

This way of viewing the world is absolutely dominant.  We take this to be truth.  If there is a truth we believe in, this is it.  That there is not enough, there is not enough so we have to be committed to our side and we have to grab and clutch and hold on and fight and make sure we have enough for ours.  We view this as truth, as reality, as the way it is.   But it is not…

It is into this sad world dominated by the paradigm of scarcity that the Son of God appears.  And on a grassy hillside overlooking the Sea of Galilee, Jesus gives us a sign of just how mistaken we are…

Again, that’s enough for now, to be continued.
 
 
“After this Jesus went away to the other side of the Sea of Galilee, which is the Sea of Tiberias. And a large crowd was following him, because they saw the signs that he was doing on the sick. Jesus went up on the mountain, and there he sat down with his disciples. Now the Passover, the feast of the Jews, was at hand. Lifting up his eyes, then, and seeing that a large crowd was coming toward him, Jesus said to Philip, “Where are we to buy bread, so that these people may eat?” He said this to test him, for he himself knew what he would do. Philip answered him, “Two hundred denarii worth of bread would not be enough for each of them to get a little.” One of his disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother, said to him, “There is a boy here who has five barley loaves and two fish, but what are they for so many?” Jesus said, “Have the people sit down.” Now there was much grass in the place. So the men sat down, about five thousand in number. Jesus then took the loaves, and when he had given thanks, he distributed them to those who were seated. So also the fish, as much as they wanted. And when they had eaten their fill, he told his disciples, “Gather up the leftover fragments, that nothing may be lost.” So they gathered them up and filled twelve baskets with fragments from the five barley loaves left by those who had eaten. When the people saw the sign that he had done, they said, “This is indeed the Prophet who is to come into the world!” Perceiving then that they were about to come and take him by force to make him king, Jesus withdrew again to the mountain by himself.”
‭‭John‬ ‭6:1-15‬ ‭ESV‬‬

 

John Lewis