You Will Even Accuse Yourself

You Will Even Accuse Yourself

Last time I wrote, I finished by saying that Jesus had to react so strongly to Peter’s rebuke (accusation?) at Jesus’s telling to the disciples that  the Son of Man must suffer many things and be rejected by the elders and the chief priests and the scribes and be killed, and after three days rise again because this rebuke/accusation from Peter (You’ve got the wrong idea of what it means to be Messiah Jesus!) had the potential to put self-doubt in the mind of Jesus.   And yes, Jesus could suffer from the temptation to self-doubt.  To doubt oneself is a very human thing to do, and Jesus was very human of very human….and therefore subject to all the temptations we humans suffer with.

Was Jesus tempted with self doubt?   I don’t know the answer to that question for sure, but it’s certainly possible.   And I do know this – everybody doubted Jesus.  And I do mean everybody.  Think about the struggle this would cause for you and I.

Think about the struggle Jesus must have had with this.  He was doubted by the chief priests, the scribes and the elders.   Did this affect him?   I don’t know, but they were the authorities, the scholars, the theologians, and they were saying Jesus, you’re vision is wrong.  Did this induce any self doubt?  I don’t know, maybe not.  We’ll say that no, it didn’t.

Jesus was doubted by his own disciples.   That’s got to hurt.  He was doubted by his own brothers – For not even his brothers believed in him.”  John 7:5 ESV.  Even worse than that, Jesus’ own mother doubted him.   And when his family heard it, they went out to seize him, for they were saying, “He is out of his mind.””  Mark 3:21 ESV.   We read this and chuckle, but there’s nothing funny going on.   This is a family intervention.  Mary gets James and Joses and Judas and Simon, Jesus’ four brothers, maybe some of his sisters, and says to them “Jesus is mentally unstable.  Your older brother is mentally unstable.  He’s got these ideas and they’re just going to get him killed.   We’ve got to intervene.”   And they go to seize him because they think Jesus is suffering a mental breakdown.

Think I’m reading too much into this?   Maybe.   But let’s skip 10 verses later, and what does it say?   “And his mother and his brothers came, and standing outside they sent to him and called him. And a crowd was sitting around him, and they said to him, “Your mother and your brothers are outside, seeking you.” And he answered them, “Who are my mother and my brothers?” And looking about at those who sat around him, he said, “Here are my mother and my brothers! For whoever does the will of God, he is my brother and sister and mother.“” Mark 3:31-35 ESV.   We like to spiritualize this, I would say we over-spiritualize it.  This is a serious family situation.  Jesus is with a group of disciples, they had just tried a family intervention and they are coming to try again.  Mom and the brothers send word in to Jesus that they are looking for him, and Jesus says what?  Who are my mother and my brothers?”   Hmmmmpht.   My brothers and my mother??!!  These people that are hearing the word of God and doing it, these are my mother and brothers!   Ok, when your mom calls you, just say “Who is my mother”, and let me know how that works out for you.   This is a very tense family situation.

They don’t believe in him.  They love him, but they don’t believe in him.  They don’t believe he can go about being Messiah and live the Sermon on the Mount at the same time.   He has this idea, somehow, that he’s going to liberate Israel and bring about the kingdom of God, yet not kill anybody!!   Turn the other cheek and bring the kingdom of God? That’ll never work.  That’ll just get you killed Jesus….and that’ll be the end of that.

Know what’s really heartbreaking, when you think about it??   Jesus went to the cross with NOBODY believing in him.  They loved him, yes, but they did not believe in him.  James loved him, John loved him, Peter loved him.  Other disciples loved him.  Judas, maybe not.  Mary Magdalene loved him, his mother loved him.   Yes they loved him.  But they did not believe in him.  They believed Jesus had missed it.  He’d had the potential to be Messiah, he coulda been Messiah.  But he clung to his lofty ideals, and now the whole thing is falling apart, and just like they said he went and got himself killed.   And in the eyes of those whom Jesus most cared about, he was dying as a failure.   Please try to imagine how hard that must have been…to go through all that with nobody believing in him.   That’s why in the Garden of Gethsemane an angel had to come and strengthen him.  He had to have a direct message from the father.  You’re doing the right thing.  Don’t give way to self doubt now.  Don’t let those negative people and comments get through to your psyche and cripple you.  Stay the course.

When people get into their head that messiah, Christ, is to be a certain way, it’s almost impossible to change it.  If you try to change their idea of Christ, you will be subject to accusation.   Even Jesus did not succeed in changing people’s understanding of what it means to be Christ until after his resurrection.  They just could not accept, and their response was to do what Peter did, and accuse him of making a mistake.

When we begin to discover Christ in a deeper way, when we begin talk about Jesus in a different way, when we take the American varnish off of Jesus and show people that Jesus is not an American committed to the American dream and our superpower status, and that in fact the American way and the Jesus way are not the same way but  are often at odds with one another, people might say all kinds of things about you.   Just like his own countrymen said all kinds of thing about Jesus for showing that God was not just God for the Jews, but for Gentiles and the whole world as well.

But it was true.  It’s still true.  We need to come to see Jesus as he is, Christ for all, not just a nationalized Christ, the American Jesus.  But this messes with peoples understanding of Christ and who Christ is.   When we begin to rub that red white and blue varnish off of Jesus, people will not like it.  People are very comfortable with that red white and blue varnish, start rubbing that off and people will accuse you of all kinds of things.   Start rubbing that off, there will be star spangled trouble.

If you get accused, though, you can’t lash out.  If you lash out, it just fuels the Satan, It gets worse and worse and turns into a hurricane.  You forgive.  You absorb the blow and forgive.  Father forgive them because they don’t know what they do.  If possible, you try to help them see what they are doing.  But what you cannot do is let the accusation get into your head and become self doubt.  Because what happens is you take the accusation up and begin to practice self accusation.    You become your own Satan in your own head, and you go to hell inside your own head.  Anybody else know about this?   You become subject to unjust accusation, but you begin to take it up against yourself.  You begin to accuse yourself.  You idiot, you’re stupid. What in the world are you doing?   Am I the only one?

It will begin to flood you with self doubt, you will be paralyzed, things will spiral out of control.  We can’t lash out, but we also cannot afford to allow these accusations to lodge in our head and fill us with self doubt.  How many if you have ever been the victim of unjust accusation?   Might go all the way back to when you were five years old.  Maybe your dad or your mom told you you idiot.  You’re no good,  you’ll never amount to anything.   That was unjust.  Nobody should ever say that to anybody, especially a child.  Rationally you know it was unjust, not right, yet forty years later it’s still lodged in you.  So now you take up against yourself.  You say to yourself, you’re no good, you’ll never amount to anything.   Maybe it was a parent, a brother, a friend, maybe it was an enemy.  Maybe a boss, could be anybody.  You’ve begun to be victimized by unjust accusation but it’s gotten into your head.  And you need to pray like this – “Lord, give me the strength to be strong and true, because lord when the devil gets in my head I’m so blue…”.  (From an Irish folk song…)

Never forget that the spirit of accusation is the spirit of Satan.  It’s the un-holy spirit.  The opposite of this is the Holy Spirit.  The Holy Spirit is the spirit of advocacy.   God says “I love you.  I’m for you.  I’m on your side.  You’re going to make it.”   You’re ok, and when you’re not ok it’s ok not to be ok.  Bring it to the Holy Spirit, to your brothers and sisters who do the will of God and lift you up.

John Lewis

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Peter’s Accusation

So what did that discussion about the satan being the Accuser have to do with Jesus rebuking Peter with Get behind me, Satan!??

“And he began to teach them that the Son of Man must suffer many things and be rejected by the elders and the chief priests and the scribes and be killed, and after three days rise again. And he said this plainly. And Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him. But turning and seeing his disciples, he rebuked Peter and said, “Get behind me, Satan! For you are not setting your mind on the things of God, but on the things of man.”” Mark 8:31-33 ESV.   So what is going on here??   Let’s expand the text, get the rest of the story.  Peter has just made the seminal confession that Jesus is the Messiah.   “And Jesus went on with his disciples to the villages of Caesarea Philippi. And on the way he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that I am?” And they told him, “John the Baptist; and others say, Elijah; and others, one of the prophets.” And he asked them, “But who do you say that I am?” Peter answered him, “You are the Christ.“”  Mark 8:27-29 ESV.   Is Peter right??   Of course he is!   You are the one who is sent by God to be the true king of Israel to restore Israel!   Jesus says so immediately, as recorded by Matthew.   “And Jesus answered him, “Blessed are you, Simon Bar-Jonah! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father who is in heaven.”   Matthew 16:17 ESV.   But there is a problem.  Whereas Peter is correct in identifying Jesus as the Messiah, the true anointed king of Israel who will restore the fortunes of Israel, he has many wrong conceptions about what it means to be Messiah.  He has many wrong ideas about who and what Christ is.

His controlling paradigm are the great delivering kings that have come before Jesus.  Peter, along with everyone else st this time, thinks of Messiah in terms  of Joshua, David, and Judah Maccabaeus.  These were the three icons, the three pictures of what messiah was to be like in the Jewish mind.  Joshua, who led them into the promised land and drove out the Canaanites.  David, who conquered the Philistines and led Israel into its greatest glory.  And 200 years earlier, Judah Maccabaeus, who is a kind of national hero, a kind of George Washington, who had led the war of independence against the Greeks.  Now, they were waiting for the Messiah who would do like Joshua, who killed the Canaanites.  Like David, who killed the Philistines.  And like Judah Maccabaeus who killed the Greeks, now they were waiting for the Messiah who would kill the Romans and bring about the glory of Israel.

So Peter is right when he says Jesus is the messiah, the true king of Israel who will redeem the nation.  But he’s controlled by a paradigm that says this means that he must mount an army, win a war, and kill the enemies.  Peter is controlled by a nationalistic vision.  So when Jesus in this exact same context at Caesarea Phillipi says the Son of Man must suffer many things and be rejected by the elders and the chief priests and the scribes and be killed, and after three days rise againPeter and the rest couldn’t hear the part about being raised again.   For about 200-300 years the idea of a general resurrection and being raised from the dead at the end of the age had come into the Jewish mind, and they might’ve heard “yeah, ok, we’re all going to be raised from the dead….someday.”

So instead, all Peter could hear was “I’m going to go to Jerusalem, and instead of sitting upon a throne, and conquering the Romans, the Herodiams, and the Hasmoneans, I’m going to be killed..,”.  This is seriously messing with Peters vision of Christ.  He can not accept that, he is in fact threatened by this.  Peter did not  leave his fishing nets to go to Jerusalem and lose.   But Jesus is saying he’s going to fail, he’s going to die.  He’s going to lose.  He’s got to win!!!

So read what it says.  He takes Jesus aside, not to be counseled by Jesus, not to ask for clarification, for a better understanding of what Jesus was saying.  No, it says  And Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him.   He takes Jesus aside and begins to rebuke him, to accuse him.  He began to say “Jesus, you have misunderstood what it means to be Messiah!  You are wrong about the idea of what Messiah is supposed to do.  I rebuke you!”   Can you picture this conversation??   And Jesus whirls around and says Get behind me, Satan!   Back off Accuser!!  Get back in line Accuser!!

Let’s play the scene again.  Who do people say that I am??…Elijah, John the Baptist raised again, others…Who do you say that I am?…The Messiah, the christ, the one who will redeem israel…you’re blessed, Simon son of Jonah, God has shown this to you…. But know this.  I’m going to go to Jerusalem, I’m going to suffer many things, I’ll be killed, but then, yes I’ll be raised….Jesus, this will never happen to you, you are wrong.  I rebuke that!  You have a wrong idea of what it means to be Messiah, I rebuke that Jesus!!…Get behind me Satan!  Get in line Accuser!   Back off Accuser.  Satan, back off!!!!

Why did Jesus respond  so strongly to Peters accusation??   Because he had to.  Not so much for Peters sake, or for our sake, but for his own sake.   When Peter accused Jesus of being wrong about the mission of Messiah (and make no mistake, that’s exactly what Peter was doing, accusing Jesus of being wrong about what messiah was to be and do), it fed right into what was always Jesus’ greatest temptation.  Jesus’s greatest recurring temptation was to go about being messiah the old way.  The way of Joshua, the way of David, the way of Judah Maccabaeus, the way that everybody wanted and expected him to do.  They wanted the second coming of David, just like David had done it.  Or Joshua, or Judah Maccabaeus.

That was a real temptation for Jesus.  We see it crop up in the wilderness when he is fasting and praying before he began his ministry.   He’s praying and contemplating how he’s going to begin his ministry.  He says, you know, I could be like those Pharaohs, I could be like those Caesars, and I could gather all the nations under my….but that’s a Satanic idea.  He has to say get behind me Satan.  He recognizes it as bowing down and worshipping the Satan.  “Then Jesus said to him, “Be gone, Satan! For it is written, “‘You shall worship the Lord your God and him only shall you serve.'””  Matthew 4:10 ESV.

This temptation comes through the mouth of Peter, and Jesus has to react harshly to Peter because Jesus himself was tempted to go that way.  When Peter says ….“Far be it from you, Lord! This shall never happen to you.”  Matthew 16:22 ESV, part of Jesus, part of the humanity of Jesus, says Ohhh, I want that!  I don’t want this to happen to me!   Jesus has to react because he too is tempted to go the old way.  

Finally It shows up again in the Garden of Gethsemane.  He’s praying God I don’t  want to go this way!  Father Not this way!  Take the cup from me!   Not this way!   ….“Father, if you are willing, remove this cup from me. Nevertheless, not my will, but yours, be done.”” Luke 22:42 ESV.  But he wins.   Not my will, but yours, be done.

Peter’s accusation – You’ve made a mistake about what Messiah is like and is supposed to do –  had the possibility of getting into Jesus’s head and filling him with self doubt.  (??????).   How can that be?   Jesus was fully human, AMEN??!!   And tempted in all things as we are!!   Amen again.    Anybody reading this ever been tempted by self doubt??   Well so was Jesus.

And Jesus was doubted by everybody.  And I do mean everybody.   More on this next time.

“And he began to teach them that the Son of Man must suffer many things and be rejected by the elders and the chief priests and the scribes and be killed, and after three days rise again. And he said this plainly. And Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him. But turning and seeing his disciples, he rebuked Peter and said, “Get behind me, Satan! For you are not setting your mind on the things of God, but on the things of man.””

Mark 8:31-33 ESV

http://bible.com/59/mrk.8.31-33.esv

John Lewis

The Accuser

“And he began to teach them that the Son of Man must suffer many things and be rejected by the elders and the chief priests and the scribes and be killed, and after three days rise again. And he said this plainly. And Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him. But turning and seeing his disciples, he rebuked Peter and said, “Get behind me, Satan! For you are not setting your mind on the things of God, but on the things of man.””  Mark 8:31-33 ESV

If we are to understand what Jesus means by Get behind me, Satan!addressed to his disciple Peter, we need to revisit a little bit of the origin of what the Bible calls “the Satan”, Ha-Satan. We’ve grown accustomed to thinking of Satan as a proper noun or name.  Look, there’s Mark, there’s Jon, there’s Satan!    But it’s not that way.  It’s simply a noun which is always used with the definitive article, the Ha-Satan, the satan, which simply means the accuser.

The satan is referred to three times in the Old Testament.  Once in passing in an episode with David, once in Zechariah where it says “Then the angel showed me Jeshua the high priest standing before the angel of the Lord. The Accuser, Satan, was there at the angel’s right hand, making accusations against Jeshua.”  Zechariah 3:1 NLT

But the only episode that has a lot of detail about HaSatan comes from the book of Job.  In the book of Job we find the HaSatan, the satan, accusing Job before God, and then orchestrating three successive catastrophes that befall righteous Job.  First, he loses his livelihood and he’s bankrupt.  On the heels of that, he loses his children.  He’s bereaved.   As if these two were not enough, Job loses his health and is struck down with terrible afflicting boils.   The satan is behind it all…

Yet after chapter 2, and Job is a very lengthy book, satan is never again mentioned.  He disappears from the text but does not disappear from the story.  Beginning in chapter 3, satan, the accuser, morphs into or posseses Jobs three friends, Bildad, Eliphaz, Zophar.   These are three friends of Job who come to commiserate with him in his sorrow and suffering.   He’s lost his livelihood, his children and his health and they come as friends to share his sorrow.

But very quickly, they morph into or become possessed by HaSatan and they begin to accuse Job.  They begin to attempt to explain to Job why these three catastrophes have come upon him and they insist it must be because Job has sinned.  Somehow Job has done something to cause him to deserve this horrible fate.  And Job protests his innocence.  As these successive debates continue to rage through the book, they become increasingly vicious as they become more and more HaSatan-esque, or satanic, and more viciously accuse their friend Job.

Now when God does arrive on the scene in the book of Job, he announces clearly that Eliphaz, Bildad and Zophar have NOT spoken accurately concerning Job.  They have falsely accused him.  But let’s take a moment and ask why?  Why did Eliphaz, Bildad, and Zophar pile on and accuse their suffering friend.  Why would anyone do that to their friend??

The reason they were accusing Job was out of a motivation to preserve their world view.  Their world view was this – “Good things happen to good people.  Bad things happen to bad people (does this sound familiar?).   We are good people, so nothing bad will ever happen to us.”   That was the false foundation to their false security.   It’s how they maintained their peace of mind.  It’s how they slept at night.  That was their paradigm.

So when Job says “No, that’s not true.  Because I’m a good man to whom horrible things have happened…”, it threatens the very foundation of their security.  So they have to attack Job in order to preserve the false foundation of their false security, and they manifest the satan.   See how that works?  It’s very interesting, very diabolical.   But we need to recognize it.  You could say it this way – satan is the spirit of accusation.

Learn this – the satan is the spirit of accusation, especially of fear based accusation, which is what was motivating the miserable comforters of Job.   It wasn’t that they hated Job, they didn’t.   But it was that they needed to preserve their own sense of well being and future security by assuring themselves that this is true – that good things happen to good people, bad things happen to bad people.   And we’re good people, nothing bad will ever happen to us.  And Job was threatening to undo that, to expose that as a lie, because he was saying, “No, I’m a good man to whom bad things have happened.”   And so to preserve the false foundation of their false security, they manifested the satan and began to accuse him.

The spirit of accusation is the spirit of satan, especially fear based accusation.  Because when people feel threatened in some way, their security, their position, their politics, their ideology, their worldview, when they feel that threatened, they tend to  channel that anxiety into accusation.   And here’s the kicker – it works.  If you are feeling threatened in some way, something is happening in your world, in your worldview, you ideology, in your situation, your circumstances that is causing you anxiety, if you will channel that anxiety into an accusation against someone else, it will make you feel better.  Just like meth, or heroin, or alcohol, or whatever your drug of choice, will make you feel better.   But it’s also satanic.

It will make you feel better.  If you are anxious and tense because something is challenging your worldview or circumstances or assumptions and you’re being forced to look at things differently and it is causing you anxiety and you channel that anxiety into an accusation against someone else, you will feel better.  And because you feel better, you might think “this must be God…”.  You’re only off a little bit…it’s actually the devil.

This is the primary work of satan, and it’s the opposite of the Holy Spirit.   The spirit of satan is the spirit of accusation, the Holy Spirit is the spirit of advocacy.  He is the advocate.  He is the one who comes and takes our side and stands with us and comforts us.  He stands with us against the accusation.

Whats this got to do with Jesus rebuking Peter with Get behind me, Satan!??   Guess that’s for next time…

“And he began to teach them that the Son of Man must suffer many things and be rejected by the elders and the chief priests and the scribes and be killed, and after three days rise again. And he said this plainly. And Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him. But turning and seeing his disciples, he rebuked Peter and said, “Get behind me, Satan! For you are not setting your mind on the things of God, but on the things of man.””

Mark 8:31-33 ESV

http://bible.com/59/mrk.8.31-33.esv

John Lewis

Sometimes We Cry

Sometimes We Cry

My first message in about a week and a half, went on family vacation, and I unplugged and recharged.  Actually started this last Friday, I’m finally ready to share it with you…

“Woe is me because of my hurt! My wound is grievous. But I said, “Truly this is an affliction, and I must bear it.””

Jeremiah 10:19 ESV

http://bible.com/59/jer.10.19.esv

Pain in the great equalizer in life.  Pain comes to us all, unwanted and uninvited.  It puts us on an even playing field.   It comes to us all.  It comes to the rich and the poor.  Black and white.  Educated and uneducated.  Powerful and weak.  Religious and irreligious.  In a broken world, pain is inevitable.

Jeremiah’s pain, Woe is me because of my hurt!was the pain of watching his country be invaded and fall to the Babylonians.  Jeremiah was a prophet in the southern kingdom called Judah.  At the time they were being ransacked by the Babylonians.  His pain was the pain of watching his countrymen captured and carried off to Babylon.  The pain of watching his city, the holy city of Jerusalem, being burned and ransacked, with the holy temple of Jewish worship being destroyed by a pagan army.

Jeremiah was able to put to words the pain we have all felt.  We’ve all felt pain, but sometimes in those painful moments we just can’t find the words to express the hurt you feel.  Maybe the wound is more than you can bear.

Jeremiah’s pain was the pain of a nation falling.  Maybe your pain is the physical pain from some disease or malady.  Maybe you feel the emotional pain of someone you have loved who has hurt you.  Maybe it’s the hidden pain of abuse.  Maybe it’s the stinging pain of loss through death.  Maybe you know the shameful pain of personal failure.

For many of us, it’s the pain and regret and sorrow of lifelong struggles with with addictions that cause us to hurt other people.  How many examples have we seen of the saying hurt people hurt people.  We who have been wounded and have been hurt, end up hurting others.  How many deep wounds have we seen and felt that we have tried to self medicate with sex, alcohol, gambling, drugs, but we just can’t.  We end up, out of our hurt and wounded-ness, hurting the people we love.  We tell our stories, we tell of our lies, we tell of stealing from those we love, we abandon them, we break our relationships apart.   Truly this is an affliction, and I must bear it.   

Jeremiah, living in a time when the southern kingdom and Jerusalem itself were being laid bare, had in mind the words of Isaiah.  Jeremiah became the weeping prophet, carrying the wound of the fallen Jerusalem.    But one hundred years before Jeremiah, God had sent to Israel the prophet Isaiah both with a warning and a message of hope.   Isaiah opens the second half his book of prophecy with these words –  “Comfort, comfort my people, says your God. Speak tenderly to Jerusalem, and cry to her that her warfare is ended, that her iniquity is pardoned, that she has received from the Lord ‘s hand double for all her sins.”  Isaiah 40:1-2 ESV.  One hundred years before Jeremiah and his wounds and his hurt, Isaiah prophesied that a day of new creation was coming to Israel.  There would come a day when Israel would flourish, where they would build houses and plant vineyards, and have babies and lots of babies and grand-babies and have big kosher BBQs and the family would all be together.  One hundred years before Jeremiah’s pain there was this great prophecy that there would be a time of flourishing and this time of new creation when God would come and dwell with his people again.

Then there was this promise that Isaiah gave – “The wolf and the lamb shall graze together; the lion shall eat straw like the ox, and dust shall be the serpent’s food. They shall not hurt or destroy in all my holy mountain,” says the Lord.” Isaiah 65:25 ESV.  The hurt Jeremiah felt compelled to hold onto (ever been there?), he would not have to hold onto any longer.  There was coming a time of new creation where in God’s rule and reign they would not hurt or destroy anymore.  Isaiah prophecies this yet one hundred years later there was the fall of Jerusalem and the people watched as the wolves and lions from Babylon came devouring…

Yet a promise remained from Isaiah.  Even at this point in Israel’s history, God had not forsaken them, he had not given up.  There was coming one called the anointed one, the Christ, the Messiah.  There was one coming who would come to bring God’s kingdom, God’s rule and reign, to the earth.   Remember, when we speak of the kingdom of God, we are not talking about a place but a power.   The church is not the kingdom of God, but rather the witness to the kingdom of God.  We are the servants of the kingdom of God.   But the Kingdom of God is God’s rule and reign on the earth.  So there was this prophecy that even through the destruction of the temple there would be a day of new creation and that Messiah would come.

Isaiah tells us that when Messiah would come he would be a suffering King, that he would take all the hurt, pain and sorrow of Israel away.   In Isaiah 53 it tells us “Surely he has borne our griefs and carried our sorrows; yet we esteemed him stricken, smitten by God, and afflicted.”  Isaiah 53:4 ESV. Jeremiah is carrying this wound, this hurt, this pain, yet he has the promise that Messiah would come and be a suffering king.

Five hundred years (God does move slowly, doesn’t he?) after Isaiah’s prophecy a virgin girl gives birth to her first born son, and they would call his name Jesus, for he would save God’s people from their sins.  Jesus came to bring God’s kingdom, his rule and reign, to bring God’s holy mountain to the earth.   Jesus came to bring the Kingdom of God and show us what God is like.

So what do we see in the gospels that Jesus was doing?   He was proclaiming and preaching that God’s kingdom is a peaceable kingdom.  There’s not going to be eye for an eye, tooth for tooth anymore (even though sometimes we argue with him over this!).   No more hating, destroying and killing of your enemies, that’s done away with.  We see Jesus proclaiming a kingdom of peace and we see Jesus healing the sick.  And as he was healing the sick, he was demonstrating what God is like, what life lived in the kingdom of God is like.

What do we see about God through the preaching and ministry of Jesus?  We see that God is good, full of compassion and mercy, that he’s a God who wants to mend what is broken and heal what is diseased.  We see in the ministry of Jesus the promise of Isaiah coming to pass, that there will be a time when people will come under the rule and reign of God.  In that place, They shall not hurt or destroy.

So Jesus has come.  He has proclaimed the kingdom.   And you know how the story ends.   At the end of his life, Jesus dies.  He goes to the cross, gets executed, and dies.  One of his closest followers, Peter, says this about Jesus in his death.    “He himself bore our sins in his body on the tree, that we might die to sin and live to righteousness. By his wounds you have been healed.”  1 Peter 2:24 ESV.  Amen.

Jesus came not just to demonstrate what life looks like in the kingdom of God, but Jesus came and he collected, he carried our griefs and sorrows, he carried all sorts of human pain into himself, took it into death, and overcame it in his resurrection that he might offer healing to all.  (Amen!)  So in his suffering, Jesus was suffering for us, but also with us.  Jesus experienced all sorts of human pain.  He experienced your pain.   He experienced it for you so that he can take it in himself, overcome it, then rise again to offer healing for your wounds.  He took your pain and your brokenness so that you don’t have to carry it anymore.  So that if you choose to live under the rule and reign of god, then you shall not hurt or destroy anymore.

Have you experienced the pain of rejection?   Jesus was abandoned and rejected by all of his disciples at his arrest and execution.  Experienced the pain of injustice?  Jesus was unjustly tried and sentenced to death.  Experienced the pain of bondage and addiction?  Jesus was bound and held against his will at his arrest.  Experienced the pain of physical abuse?   Jesus was slapped, spat upon and beaten before his death.  Experienced the emotional pain of harsh words spoken to you in anger?  Jesus was mocked, ridiculed, laughed at and scolded as he died.  Experienced the shame of sexual abuse?   Jesus at the cross was stripped naked, exposed for all to see.  Experienced physical pain from disease or malady or sickness?   Jesus experienced real human physical pain at his crucifixion.  Experienced profound disappointment with God?  Jesus at the cross cried out…“And at the ninth hour Jesus cried with a loud voice, “Eloi, Eloi, lema sabachthani?” which means, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”” Mark 15:34 ESV. Experienced the stinging pain of the death of a loved one?  Jesus experienced real human death.  Jesus cried out at the end from the cross “Then Jesus, calling out with a loud voice, said, “Father, into your hands I commit my spirit!” And having said this he breathed his last.”   Luke 23:46 ESV.  He breathed his last and went into death.

Jesus took into death with him all amounts human suffering and pain, and he overcame it in his resurrection to offer healing and solace.  So when people ask, and they will, why suffering??   Or for those who make it really personal, and when they are hurting or in that moment of pain, ask where is God, why am I hurting??   God thunders back from heaven, saying I entered into that kind of pain, I took it for you, I overcame, so that you may be healed.  Jesus Christ became a co-sufferer with humanity.

Where does all this come from?  God does not give us the answer, scripture does not give us the answer of why suffering?   But God does give us the remedy.  He becomes human, suffers with us, and takes all of our suffering within himself so that our wounds may be healed.

Healing for you can begin today.  Offer your brokenness to the one who was broken for you.  Exchange your empire of dirt for life in the kingdom of God.  Enter into the kingdom of God, that place where Isaiah promises that we will not hurt or destroy anymore.  Let healing begin…

At the Door

At the Door

“Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth, for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and the sea was no more. And I saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband. And I heard a loud voice from the throne saying, “Behold, the dwelling place of God is with man. He will dwell with them, and they will be his people, and God himself will be with them as their God. He will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning, nor crying, nor pain anymore, for the former things have passed away.”” Revelation 21:1-4 ESV.   Our great eschatological (end times) hope.   The great Christian hope.   As I’ve said many times before, it’s not that we are going, but that He is coming, coming down out of heaven from God.   God will, finally, come and dwell with us, walk with us, and forever be with His people.  And we with Him.   And there will be no more tears, no more death, no more mourning, no more pain.  A wondrous and beautiful end to the story, not so much an end but a final beginning, with all things made new, right and beautiful.  More beautiful than our minds can even imagine…

This is the end we wait for, the end we hope for, the end, in fact, that we actually believe all things are headed for.   For all the pain, violence, anger, hatred, ugliness of the world in which we live, we live with the hope of an ultimate beauty in our hearts.  The hope that for all the ugliness with which we live, the beauty for which we strive will ultimately be our dwelling place.  As Fyodor Dostoyevsky once said, ‘tis beauty that will save the world.

Oh, we do catch glimpses now.   We do can find beauty in the ugliness around us.   We find the beauty in God’s good creation.  Maybe that’s why our Millennials are all about the experiences of life, all about the destination, the next destination they can snap or tweet their presence to the world from.   The next beautiful place they can take their selfie and prove to the world that such beauty exists, and I was there.

This is ultimately what we hope for.  But how?  How do we get there from here.   By what means will the world come to such a beautiful ends?   How will this peace on earth, with God reigning, finally, as our one true king, with every knee bowed and every mouth declaring that Jesus Christ is Lord come about?

We know that it will be God’s presence and power that ultimately brings this about, but does that mean we have no part??   Are we mere spectators to what God is doing?   The answer is, no we are not.  There is a human instrumentality involved.   This is why God waits for the fullness of time determined by our abilities and capacities to receive what he would give.   We are called to be part of his efforts.  We have a participation in the making of all things right and new.  God works with humankind, and we with him, to extend his Kingdom into all our affairs, and the works around us.

Look at Revelation 3:20 – “Behold, I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in to him and eat with him, and he with me.” Revelation 3:20 ESV.  This is part of Christ’s message to the church in Laodicea, which wraps up his direct message to the seven churches in Revelation.  Christ stands and knocks on the door, that is for sure.  But it is not the door of the individual human heart, as we are so often told and so quickly assume.   Rather, Christ is knocking on the door of the church.   It will help us greatly to understand the gospel, the church, and indeed our own lives today if we can understand from this that Christ is outside the church as know and identify it.

Yes, we know that “For where two or three are gathered in my name, there am I among them.””  Matthew 18:20 ESV.  And yes, Christ is with us always.  But he is also on the outside,  calling in to us.  Remember Him, he’s out there, in that big bad world, chasing down that lost sheep.   He left the ninety nine to chase me down, he still leaves the ninety nine to chase that one.  He still eats with the sinners.  The prodigals.  The lepers.  The outcast.  Those who don’t go to church, ain’t going to church, and don’t wanna hear about no d**n church…

Yes, Christ is with us always, but he calls us further up and further in to a. deeper fellowship than we’ve  ever known.   He’s out there, in the world, where we don’t have the courage to follow him fully.  Our little church, no matter how big your church may be, will always be too small, too cramped for Him.   Inside is just not big enough, only outside is great enough for the creator of the universe.  He’s out there, building his kingdom.  One sinner at a time.

Meanwhile, the church cries out.  We struggle with hating the sin but loving the sinner.   Jesus doesn’t worry about all that.  He just loves.  The loves the sinners and the saints.   All the same.   We still struggle to accept and understand this.  We hold onto our stones, ready to throw them at any time.

Yet he knocks on our door.  He invites us to invite Him in.  We are, after all, the ones most prepared to fully receive Him, and fully cooperate and participate in what he is doing.  We are the ones waiting and praying for his return.   We are the ones most longing for all things to be made new.

He stands at the door, knocking.  Will we ever let Him in??   Or, would we crucify him all over again?

John Lewis

Reckless

Reckless

Spent the past weekend being reminded of the truth that God laid out for us so long ago, all the way back to the beginning, as in in the beginning…a truth which we’ve all heard and we all know inherently within our being, even if we are not actually conscious of it in our minds.

In the Genesis creation account, God declares much to be good, and when I say he declares much to be good, I mean he declares everything he has created to be good.   And God saw that the light was good.   God called the dry land Earth, and the waters that were gathered together he called Seas. And God saw that it was good.   Over and over again, And God saw that it was good.   Until we get to the sixth day, And God saw everything that he had made, and behold, it was very good. And there was evening and there was morning, the sixth day.   All that God made, the heavens and the earth, the waters and the land, the seas and the heavens, the plants trees and vegetation, all the animals of the sea and on the dry land, everything God created in and on this world, of which we sing in songs so joyfully that it is not our home, is all goodgood, and then, just in case you missed it, very good.  God gave us a beautiful, wonderful, good, good and very good creation (His words, not mine).   Take and do with that what you will.

But now to the point.  What is the first thing in the Bible that is called not good by God?   “Then the Lord God said, “It is not good that the man should be alone; I will make him a helper fit for him.”   Men – don’t miss this and don’t get this twisted.   It is not good that the man should be alone.  It is not good for man be alone.  Yes, man, it is not good for you to be alone.    Including you.  And you women also, but of course women don’t seem to struggle with this as much as men.

Because we men, well, after all, we are men.   We are born and raised, proud, red-blooded, pick ourselves by the bootstraps, don’t cry, never let ‘em see you sweat, American men.   This is the script we live by, that is how we are taught to live.   And even when we are surrounded by a crowd of people, we live this way, isolated, behind our own walls, sharing nothing of ourselves.

This is BS.  This is not how we were created.  The first thing in the Bible that is declared to be not good is for man to be alone, yet we all think we are supposed to be the Lone Ranger.    This, as God the Father would say, is not good.   We are not meant to be alone.

We are made for community.  You are made for community.  You were made in the image of a God who has never not been part of a community himself (Father, Son and Holy Spirit).  We are born into community, community is not something we add to ourselves after the fact.  You are born of a father and a mother, brought forth from your mothers very womb.  We came out naked as a jay bird (Who told you you were naked?), unable go do anything for yourself.  Literally, without the community you were born into, you would not survive more than a day or two.

Think about this minute.  Not only does God tell us it is It is not good that the man should be alone, but he follows through and does not leave us alone.   “And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we have seen his glory, glory as of the only Son from the Father, full of grace and truth.”  John 1:14 ESV.  The word became flesh and dwelt among us.  God created our world that is good, good and very good.  There was perfect peace and perfect harmony in the world, until we came along.   He created mankind in his own image, but we abandoned our call to be God’s own image bearers within his creation.  Yet he does not abandon us to be alone in our broken-ness, he comes and joins us in it.

“”For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life. For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him.”

John 3:16-17 ESV.

Do we believe that God’s creation, of which we are a part of, is good?   God still does.  He believes this so deeply that he sent his own Son, Jesus Christ, into that creation, to join us in our brokenness and reconcile us to himself.  He did not come to condemn the world, God’s good, good, and very good creation, but to save it.

“And they heard the sound of the Lord God walking in the garden in the cool of the day, and the man and his wife hid themselves from the presence of the Lord God among the trees of the garden.” Genesis 3:8 ESV.   Ever since the fall, we’ve been hiding our true selves.  We’ve been isolating ourselves from the community we were created for.  We isolate ourselves, both from God and each other, and our walls build ever higher around us.   Fear grows, love withers, anger and resentment rage within.

The point is, don’t isolate yourselves.   Despite our modern culture’s lies to the contrary, we can’t walk this life, Christian or otherwise, on our own.   The very first thing the Bible tells us is not good is for man to be alone.

Stop hiding behind the bushes.  Come out, forget that you are naked, get honest with yourself and others who love you, and find healing that can only come from the love and support of those around you.

One last thought – why do we isolate.  I think it’s mostly because of fear.  We fear what others might think or say about us.  Maybe you fear what God might think or say about you.  But, from one of our favorite passages in all of scripture, Paul tells us “No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us. For I am sure that neither death nor life, nor angels nor rulers, nor things present nor things to come, nor powers, nor height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.” Romans 8:37-39 ESV.  God is Love, never forget that.  That is really the point Paul makes here.  I think that one of the great fears we have in being open, being honest, with ourselves and others is that what we’ve done is just so bad, or that somehow we just aren’t worthy of God’s love or anyone else’s love.  But Paul tells us here so many different things that can not separate us from the love of God.  Not death.  Not the powers that be.  Nothing here and now or that can come in the future.  Nor anything else in all creation.   

Nothing in all creation can separate you from the love of God.   Question – are you a created being?   Yes, you are.  Guess what?   You do not have the power to separate yourself from the love of God.   God has given us many powers and abilities, this is not one of them.  There is nothing that you can do to separate yourself from the love of God in Christ Jesus.  You can run, but you can’t hide.  He will leave the ninety to come and find you.   His love is a reckless love.  Nothing you have done can separate you from that reckless love.

God loves you, and there’s nothing you can do about it.

But – you can isolate yourself and never know it.  Why would you want to do that?

“Then the Lord God said, “It is not good that the man should be alone; I will make him a helper fit for him.””

Genesis 2:18 ESV

http://bible.com/59/gen.2.18.esv

“And God saw that the light was good. And God separated the light from the darkness.”

Genesis 1:4 ESV

http://bible.com/59/gen.1.4.esv

“God called the dry land Earth, and the waters that were gathered together he called Seas. And God saw that it was good.”

Genesis 1:10 ESV

http://bible.com/59/gen.1.10.esv

“The earth brought forth vegetation, plants yielding seed according to their own kinds, and trees bearing fruit in which is their seed, each according to its kind. And God saw that it was good.”

Genesis 1:12 ESV

http://bible.com/59/gen.1.12.esv

“And God set them in the expanse of the heavens to give light on the earth, to rule over the day and over the night, and to separate the light from the darkness. And God saw that it was good.”

Genesis 1:17-18 ESV

http://bible.com/59/gen.1.17-18.esv

“So God created the great sea creatures and every living creature that moves, with which the waters swarm, according to their kinds, and every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good.”

Genesis 1:21 ESV

http://bible.com/59/gen.1.21.esv

“And God made the beasts of the earth according to their kinds and the livestock according to their kinds, and everything that creeps on the ground according to its kind. And God saw that it was good.”

Genesis 1:25 ESV

http://bible.com/59/gen.1.25.esv

“And God saw everything that he had made, and behold, it was very good. And there was evening and there was morning, the sixth day.”

Genesis 1:31 ESV

http://bible.com/59/gen.1.31.esv

“And the gold of that land is good; bdellium and onyx stone are there.”

Genesis 2:12 ESV

http://bible.com/59/gen.2.12.esv

John Lewis

Chills

Just had a random thought enter my mind during my prayer time this morning. I’ve never thought about this before, and this thought line may be totally undeveloped for now, but I’m going to throw it out there anyway.

Just had a thought about this particular verse of scripture – Truly, I say to you, all sins will be forgiven the children of man, and whatever blasphemies they utter, but whoever blasphemes against the Holy Spirit never has forgiveness, but is guilty of an eternal sin. This same verse appears slightly differently in the gospel of Luke as well – “”And I tell you, everyone who acknowledges me before men, the Son of Man also will acknowledge before the angels of God, but the one who denies me before men will be denied before the angels of God. And everyone who speaks a word against the Son of Man will be forgiven, but the one who blasphemes against the Holy Spirit will not be forgiven.” Luke 12:8-10 ESV

And everyone who speaks a word against the Son of Man will be forgiven, but the one who blasphemes against the Holy Spirit will not be forgiven. Ok, so here’s the thought I had this morning, and it’s a very serious thought. The one who blasphemes against the Holy Spirit will not be forgiven…if we are Christians, who claim to have been “saved”, who claim to have communion with the holy, risen Christ, who have been baptized in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit, who claim to have been indwelled with the Holy Spirit, yet we walk in the world as the same angry, selfish, obnoxious person/people we were before…is that not blaspheming against the Holy Spirit? Is not the worst blasphemy we could possibly make the blasphemy of an unholy life lived in the name of the Holy Spirit?

This gives me chills. People know who I am. They know that I am a Christian, one who believes in Jesus Christ, who believes he is the way, the truth, and the life. But – is what they see from me in my life and the way I carry myself on a daily basis blaspheming against the Holy Spirit? Do they see me loving my neighbor, am I one who prays for those who would be my enemies? Do I even love my own wife and children, brothers and sisters as myself?

Chills.

How about the church as a whole?? Does the church blaspheme against the Holy Spirit in our day to day interactions with the “world” around us? Do we, as a church, walk in a spirit of protest and confrontation, or in the spirit of love and reconciliation?? Which of these spirits is of the Holy Spirit? Is one of these spirits a blasphemy of the Holy Spirit? Truly, I say to you, all sins will be forgiven the children of man, and whatever blasphemies they utter, but whoever blasphemes against the Holy Spirit never has forgiveness, but is guilty of an eternal sin.

We think we know what “sin” is. But these are words straight from the mouth of the sinless one. These are not my words, they are the words of Jesus, the one we claim to follow yet ignore his teaching. All those “unwashed masses”, Jesus says all their sins will be forgiven them, but those who blaspheme the Holy Spirit will not be forgiven, but is guilty of an eternal sin.

Again, am I guilty, in my own life on a daily basis, of blaspheming the Holy Spirit? “For what does it profit a man to gain the whole world and forfeit his soul?” Mark 8:36 ESV. Sometimes we think we have all the answers, we know every sin known to man, and we can tell the “world” all the things they are getting wrong. But, as Jesus also said, “Why do you see the speck that is in your brother’s eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye?” Matthew 7:3 ESV. How many of us point out every speck of dust in the world’s eye, when we can’t even see past the redwood tree in our own eyes? After all, it may be we who are guilty of the only sin Jesus says is unforgivable.

Chills.

“”Truly, I say to you, all sins will be forgiven the children of man, and whatever blasphemies they utter, but whoever blasphemes against the Holy Spirit never has forgiveness, but is guilty of an eternal sin” — for they were saying, “He has an unclean spirit.””

Mark 3:28-30 ESV

http://bible.com/59/mrk.3.28-30.esv

John Lewis